#3 Method to Find Companies – LinkedIn Company Pages

LinkedIn Company Pages

Linkedin company pagesUsing LinkedIn company pages is the third method you should use to find companies that can hire you. If you have not read the first two, now is the time to review the posts on Weak Ties and LinkedIn Advanced Search.

LinkedIn company pages are a valuable resource in managing your career. They offer you background on the company, stream of posts and announcements, and two hidden gems.

These two gems are:

  • “Similar Companies” on LinkedIn Mobile App or “People Also Viewed” on LinkedIn Company Page
  • Listing of everyone who works for the company who have profiles on LinkedIn

Both of these are great for researching companies.

Similar Companies

Pick a company that you are interested in and go to their company page. In the bottom right hand corner, you will find the “People Also Viewed” section.

In this example, I have chosen to research Spredfast, an Austin based Social Media startup. The “People Also Viewed” section looks like this:

similar companiesYou can click on each company logo to discover what these companies do. They usually include direct competitors, companies in adjacent industries, or companies that have complimentary products. Go to the “People Also Viewed”  for each of these LinkedIn Company Pages and keep digging. You will likely discover companies that you did not know existed.

LinkedIn Mobile App

Now, I want you to go to the main LinkedIn mobile app. If you have not installed it on your smart phone, install it now. Search for Spredfast LinkedIn company page. You screen should look like this:

spredfast mobileScroll to the bottom. spredfast_mobile_bottomWhen you tap on “Similar Companies,” you will get the following list:

spredfast similar companies

For me, this listed 32 LinkedIn company pages. Tap on each company, go to the “Similar Companies” section, and repeat.

Think of this as following bread crumbs. Although it can be quite tedious, I have had a couple of clients discover companies in adjacent industries or having complimentary products who ended up hiring them.

LinkedIn Company Pages – How You’re Connected

In the top right hand corner of every LinkedIn company page, you will find the “How You’re Connected” section.

How_Your_ConnectedYou will immediately see if you have any 1st degree connections. This is the Spredfast company page, and I have two first degree connections.

Your next move is to click on “See all.”

Let’s say I lived in Boston. I want to see if Spredfast has any employees in Boston.

Spredfast Boston

I would add Boston as a location. After I click on search, I discover the following.

Spredfast_Boston_1

Because of this, I know there are six Spredfast employees in the Boston area. I can now work on ways to reach out to these people to see what they do and how they like working for the company.

LinkedIn Company Pages

LinkedIn company pages are most valuable when you have a well-defined niche. If you are a sales manager for manufacturing equipment in the food packaging business, then this works very well.

However, if you are a corporate CPA and can work for just about anyone in any industry, you will need to find a different…more focused…strategy in looking for companies that can hire you.

Let me know if you found this valuable. Comment below or share it on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Blab – Boomer Job Search with CareerSherpa and CareerPivot

Blab with Hannah Morgan and Marc Miller

BlabThis week, I had the joy to be on a Blab session with Hannah Morgan, aka Career Sherpa.

You are probably asking yourself, “What the heck is a “Blab?”

Blab is a livestreaming platform that enables a public video chat among four participants at a time. If you are familiar with the likes of Periscope, Meerkat, and Google Hangouts, it is kind of a combination of all three.

Basically, it is a free service which facilitates an open conversation on the internet. It is layered on Twitter (you need a Twitter ID), but it is a simple and easy to use open video service. Numerous people can watch the Blab, but only four will talk together at a time.

Check out my discussion with Hannah Morgan on Job Search and Baby Boomers.

Blab Office Hours

I am considering holding Blab “office hours” one evening a week in 2016. I would be available to discuss whatever you want for that hour. You could pop in to discuss things with me, but remember: the office door would remain open! Others would drop by and listen to our discussion.

Another option—I could plan a Blab session each week to discuss a suggested topic and then open it up for dialogue. You could either be ready to be on the video or type in your question. This would be a great way to start a discussion and build our community.

My goal is to have a place where we can have a weekly gathering to discuss issues, get the audience comfortable using video technology, and have some fun. Think of it as a water cooler for those of us with a little less…or a little grayer hair on the temples. You get the idea.

If you would, please take a moment and comment at the bottom of the post to give me some feedback on this idea to use Blab.
Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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#2 Method to Find Companies – LinkedIn Advanced Search

LinkedIn Advanced Search

LinkedIn Advanced SearchLinkedIn Advanced Search is a powerful tool to find people. More importantly, it is a powerful tool to find companies that have problems you can solve or that can hire you.

In my previous post, I discussed using weak ties to find companies that can hire you.

Now, we want to find people who look, smell, and sound like you…and see where they are working.

We are going to use LinkedIn Advanced Search to query for some very specific information which includes:

  • Job Title – People who have the job title you currently have or desire to have
  • Certification – People who have certifications that are the same or similar to what you have attained
  • Keywords – Profiles that contain the same keywords that you use

LinkedIn Advanced Search – Job Title

LinkedIn Advanced Search Current TitleFor example, I want to find people in my area who have the current job title “Product Manager.”

I fill in three fields in the LinkedIn Advanced Search form:

  • Title – Product Manager
  • Set status to Current
  • Location to Austin, Texas Area (where I live)

I click on Search.

What appears is a list of LinkedIn profiles of people who have  Product Manager as their current job title and have their LinkedIn location set to Austin, Texas Area.

These individuals live in Austin, Texas Area, but this does not mean the business they work for is located in the Austin, Texas Area.

LinkedIn Advanced Search List

There are 2,590 profiles that meet my criteria, but the image to the left displays the first four.

Notice that the third entry is an individual whose headlines says Product Manager at Insights.

I can tell that Insights is a UK based company. I never knew that Insights had an office Austin. They may not have one. All I know right now is they have at least one employee in Austin.

How many employees does this company have in Austin?

I can find that out by going to the Insights LinkedIn company page.

LinkedIn_Advanced_Search_Company_Page

On the right hand side of their company page you will see how you are connected. There are 462 employees on LinkedIn. How many are in Austin? Click on See All.

LinkedIn_Advanced_Search_LocationsI clicked Add, which allowed me to type in Austin, Texas Area.

Insights has 68 employees in the Austin, Texas Area.

Does Insights have an office in the Austin, Texas Area?

I do not know, but I now know they have some kind of presence and that at least one of their employees is a Product Manager.

This may be a company with:

  • A satellite office
  • Remote employees working from home

Repeat this process for each job title variation. In this case, you might repeat using Product Management or Product Marketing.

Now, it is time to do your research on the company.

LinkedIn Advanced Search – Certifications

Next, I can perform the same type of search looking for certifications or degrees. I might search for:

  • Technical certifications like CCNA (Cisco) or MCP Microsoft
  • Human Resource Certifications like SPHR
  • Project Management Institute Certifications like PMP
  • University Degrees like MBA or PhD.
  • Professional Credentials like CPA or PE

Use the same process in searching for certifications as your did for job titles.

LinkedIn Advanced Search – Keywords

Finally, use keywords alone or in combination with either job titles or certifications.

For example, if you were looking for:

  • HR generalist role
  • At a manufacturing company
  • SPHR certification is desired

You might want to use keywords manufacturing or manufacturer, SPHR in the last name field, and HR or Human Resources in the title field.

You will need to experiment with different title variations and keywords. If you are comfortable with Boolean searches,  you can add AND or OR to the search terms. You can download a LinkedIn Boolean Search Tip sheet here.

This is time consuming, however, you will find that there are real gems to be found using LinkedIn Advanced Search. You will find companies that you had no idea had a presence in your community.

What search terms are you going to use?

Check out the rest of the social job search series.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

The Difference Between Following and Connecting on LinkedIn

Yes, there is a difference between following and connecting on LinkedIn.

You can see the status updates of someone you do not know on LinkedIn and their long-form posts (LinkedIn’s blogging equivalent)- without connecting.

(Note: this is a guest post by Hannah Morgan, aka, the Career Sherpa)

Some LinkedIn Users Won’t Connect With Strangers

One of the biggest debates by LinkedIn users is who you should connect with.

LinkedIn says

“We recommend only inviting people you know and trust because 1st-degree connections are given access to the primary email address on your account.”

As a result, many users will NOT accept invitations to connect unless they know you. Conversely, some people are LIONS (LinkedIn Open Networkers) and will connect with anyone who invites them.

As you can see, people have different opinions.

If you really want to stay in touch with someone these are a couple of workarounds.

Two Ways to Get Updates and Stay In Touch With Someone On LinkedIn

If you want to connect with someone you don’t personally know, try either of these options.

1) Always customize your invitation to connect.

Explain why you are interested in connecting with someone in your customized invitation. It isn’t a guarantee that your invitation will be accepted, but it may increase the chances.  Learn how to customize your invitation on LinkedIn’s desktop and mobile app.

2) Follow the person on LinkedIn.

This is how LinkedIn describes the differences between following and connecting.

Connections are two-way relationships of trust between people who know each other. If you’re connected to someone, you’re following them and they’re following you by default.

Following allows you to read – right on your homepage – what members are sharing publicly on LinkedIn, including content that they’ve created such as long-form posts. You can follow someone without being connected to them.

You’ll only be able to follow if the person has either written a long-form post or changed their privacy settings to enable updates to be publically follow-able.

Follow Influencers & Media

So if you want to follow some of LinkedIn’s Influencers (big name, famous people) click on this link to see who you can follow.

If you want to follow people, who have posted long-form posts, go to their LinkedIn profile, click on one of their posts, and you will see the FOLLOW button.

follow long post LIA sure fire way to follow someone’s public updates on LinkedIn is to go to their profile and click on the down arrow next to the connect button and select the FOLLOW option (if the user has made this available).

Publishers, Speakers, Business Owners, etc.

If you are a speaker, writer, famous alumni or business owner, you may be receiving a lot of requests to connect. One option is to allow/suggest people follow your public updates- but be sure you change your privacy settings.

LinkedIn’s Help Center post Managing Who Can Follow Your Updates explains how:

While your 1st-degree connections automatically follow your updates and long-form posts, anyone can follow you, even if they’re not in your network. You can limit followers to only your 1st-degree connections from the Privacy & Settings page.

  1. Move your cursor over your profile photo in the top right of your homepage and select Privacy & Settings.

    • You may be prompted to sign in.
  2. Under the Privacy Controls section, select Choose who can follow your updates.

  3. Select Everyone or Your Connections.

    • Everyone – All LinkedIn members, in and outside your network, can follow your updates.
    • Your connections – Only your 1st-degree connections can follow your updates.
  4. Click Save changes.

How To Handle Requests To Connect From Strangers

In an interesting discussion thread on Facebook, people were discussing how they handle requests from strangers. Some said they send a reply to the invitation, requesting the sender to explain how they know each other or why they want to connect. The response rate to those emails was mixed. As a business owner, accepting invitations from people you don’t know may not bother you, these are leads, right? But even LinkedIn is seeing it’s share of spam accounts, so be aware.

You may choose to send a reply message in which you’ve copied the instructions above. Your message might also explain your logic for not connecting with people you do not know.

What do you do when people you do not know invite you to connect on LinkedIn without customizing their request?  

This post originally appeared as The Difference Between Following and Connecting on LinkedIn on The Career Sherpa blog on September 8, 2015

Who is Career Sherpa, aka Hannah Morgan?

My mission: Guiding new job seekers through the treacherous terrain of job search by providing a map and tools to navigate today’s competitive landscape.

My passion: Helping the wandering and lost job seeker to understand how to look for work better.

To learn more visit CareerSherpa.net or feel free to join Hannah on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus or check out her LinkedIn profile.

Note from Marc Miller:

Hannah and I were listed in the article 50 Great People To Follow On LinkedIn, No Matter Your Industry. This is a great honor but… the flood of LinkedIn connection requests that followed was a bit much.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Getting Noticed – LinkedIn Publisher and Shareability

Getting Noticed

getting noticedIt is all about getting noticed when creating and promoting your personal brand.

I know, I know. I will hear from a lot of you that getting noticed is not what we were raised to do.

LinkedIn Publisher, LinkedIn’s blogging platform, gives you exposure to your entire LinkedIn network…and more. If you do it right, you will have to opportunity to be found by millions.

Why Publish?

There are two common reasons to publish long-form posts on LinkedIn Publisher:

  • Getting noticed by hiring companies and having your profile viewed
  • Getting noticed by prospective clients and driving traffic to your website

You should write and format your post differently depending your goals.

Constructing Your Post for Shareability

When you create great content in the form of long-form posts on LinkedIn publisher, you want people to share it. The more people that share it, the more visibility you get.

I have had multiple LinkedIn Publisher long-form posts get incredible exposure:

These four posts have accumulated 1.6 Million Views. How did these four post gain such attention?

Shareability! These posts were shared and shared and shared. If you posts are shared you are getting noticed!

How is Your Post Found?

When you publish a long-form post on LinkedIn, your connections and followers will be informed in their LinkedIn streams about your post. The larger your network, the more people who initially see the post. Getting noticed by your network is the easy part.

If a LinkedIn editor likes your post, they can put it on a LinkedIn Pulse Channel. You know that your post has been selected when you see an image at the bottom of your post.pulse channel

This greatly expands the audience who will initially see your post. Carefully review the various Pulse channels and select a few where your content fits. Review the posts that are not written by LinkedIn influencers. These are the posts written by ordinary people like you and me that were selected by LinkedIn editors for the Pulse channel. Review these posts looking for common themes. This may give you a hint on why they were selected.

It is important how you position yourself in getting noticed by a LinkedIn editor.

Enticing the Reader to Click on Your Post

The two components of your post that will get someone to initially read and click on your post are:

  • Title
  • Header Image

The easiest way to find winning post titles is to examine the top posts on the Pulse channel you have selected. The two most common methods are:

The LinkedIn Publisher header image is key to getting noticed. The recommended image header size is 698 x 400.

I use Canva.com for most of my images. Canva allows you to add text and effects to the image. If you use their stock photos, they charge US$1 per image. You can also upload your own images and edit them for free. Another site I use is 123rf.com for stock images.

I have gotten feedback that the following image attracted many to click on my 4 Signs That You Are Working for a Failing Company post.

failing company

 Writing for Shareability

To get noticed, you need readers to share your post.

I attended a session at South by Southwest Interactive conference called The Art and Science of Shareability.  I walked away with a couple of simple concepts.

  • Write to a niche where the readers will share among themselves to garner a substantial portion of that niche. This is different from traditional journalism where you write to 80% of the market and hope to garner a small share.
  • Have an emotional hook. People will share content that they can relate to emotionally.

The common themes in the posts I listed above were:

  • I stated the obvious. In 4 Signs That You Are Working for a Failing Company, I did not tell you anything that you did not already know instinctively—but no one talks about the signs!
  • I did not give a complete solution…or any solution at all. This encourages dialog and participation. When people comment, the post and their comments are shared with their connections and followers.
  • Ask for their opinion. In The Purple Cow Job Description – Should I Apply, I quote a Harvard Business Review article which stated that women were less likely to apply for job unless they were 100% qualified. I asked, “Ladies, is this true based on your experience?” I received hundreds of comments saying yes.

Give this a try. In the session on Shareability, the presenter said you will have plenty of duds before you have a winner. With each post, you will learn what works and what does not.

Let me know what works for you in getting noticed!
Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Do Others Prejudge You Based on Your LinkedIn Profile?

prejudge

NickandZuzu.com

Do You Prejudge Someone After Looking at their LinkedIn Profile?

Thom Singer’s keynote speech at Product Camp Austin 14 was on how someone decided to prejudge him based on seeing him speak. This person thought that she would not like Thom. However, when she actually met him in person, she discovered he was a really nice guy.

She had prejudged him based on seeing him on stage.

Hmmm…do we do the same with LinkedIn and other social media platforms?

Do you prejudge someone when you view their LinkedIn profile?

Do others prejudge you?

LinkedIn Profile

My presentation at Product Camp, “Leveraging LinkedIn – Creating a Professional that People will Remember“, was about establishing your brand on LinkedIn.

People will prejudge you based on your LinkedIn profile.

Yeah, yeah, I know we are not suppose to do that, but we do. This goes hand in hand with all of the discussion about Unintentional Bias.

Let’s discuss what you can do about establishing your brand on LinkedIn. We can then manage how someone might prejudge you!

LinkedIn Picture

I previously wrote a post called 3 Key Elements of your LinkedIn Photograph.
The three key points were:

  • Framing and Clothing
  • Background
  • Chin Line

Recently, I read a LinkedIn Publisher post by Jason Seiden titled What Profile Photo Works Best on LinkedIn: A Real-Life Experiment where Jason tested a variety of photos.

What he determined was the most important factor in the picture was the …….

Background!

Yes, people will prejudge you based on the background of your LinkedIn photo!

Jason’s most successful photo was one where he was a keynote speaker. You could tell that from the background.

Think about it! What does the background of your LinkedIn photo say about you?

SxSWiIf you are attending SxSWi please come to my presentation on this topic!

Headline

The vocabulary you use in your LinkedIn Headline and Summary is critical.

The default LinkedIn headline is “Current Job Title at Company Name”.

The headline is 120 characters long. USE ALL OF IT.

Instead insert phrases like “Product Management” or  “Merges & Acquisitions” and separate each with a “|”.  Check out my LinkedIn profile to see an example.

Yes, people will prejudge you based on the headline.

(More: 1st Place to use Keywords is in your LinkedIn Headline)

Summary

The Summary section of your LinkedIn profile should contain your brand story.

Tell me who you are and not what you have done.

You can tell the reader what you have done in your experience section. I have written a four posts on the process of writing your brand story.

If you want the reader to prejudge you in an authentic way, then tell an authentic story!

We will be prejudged based on our LinkedIn profile. What we want to do is paint an authentic picture of ourselves so that we can develop a real life relationship.

Do you prejudge based on what you see and read online?

By the way, I’m honored to share that my presentation won best session at Product Camp Austin!

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Twitter, Hashtags and Your Job Search

Twitter and Hashtags

hashtagsHow can using Twitter and understanding hashtags help you in your job search?

I want you to think of Twitter as a giant chat room. Messages fly back and forth around the world—and many of those messages  contain hashtags.

What the heck are hashtags?

Hashtags are just a string of letters and numbers proceeded with a “#.”

Who owns a hashtag? NO ONE!

Can you register a hashtag? NO!

How do I know what #hashtag to use? Go to hashtags.org and see how a hashtag is being used.

Some hashtags would seem to be pretty obvious but, for example, I focus on the baby boomer generation. You would think that I could use the #boomer hashtag and everyone would find my tweets.

Hmm…not so fast. If you search hashtags.org for #boomer, you would discover it is primarily used to tag tweets about the University of Oklahoma Boomer Sooner sports teams and events. I hadn’t considered that! Since I live in the heart of Texas Longhorn country, I rarely think of Boomer Sooner.

I use the hashtags #babyboomer and #babyboomers instead.

But, I still do not see how I would use them…

Twitter is a giant database of messages. You can search Twitter to find announcements and posts. In my last post, I wrote about Twitter Lists and your job search.

You do not even need a Twitter User ID to search Twitter. Just go to the Twitter Search Page.

Try this: Click here to search on #Austin #Jobs #ProjectManager

Swap out #Austin with #YourCityorLocation.

How do I know what hashtags to use when searching for a specific job? Go to hashtags.org and try different combinations.

If you search on #productmanager you will find it is almost never used. You might have to use a combination of hashtags like #product #manager.

What other hashtags can you suggest?

This can be done through trial and error. In my searches, I find Austin job tweeters use:

  • #jobs #austin
  • #job #austin
  • #atxjobs
  • #hiring #austin

Once you found a tweet announcing a position, you will want to follow the Twitter account. You may want to consider adding them to one of your Twitter Lists that you created from my last post.

What other questions do you have?

Tweet: “I have a question for @careerpivot about #hashtags and my job search.” I will do my best to respond!

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Twitter Lists and the Targeted Job Search [Video]

Twitter Lists and the Targeted Job Search

Twitter ListsYou should use Twitter and Twitter Lists in your targeted job search—and you do not need to tweet.

If you are unfamiliar with the concept of the targeted job search, please read the start of the series: Target the Company and Quit Chasing the Job. Follow the links at the end of the post to read the rest of the series.

I want you to think of Twitter as a cross between Instant Messenger (IM), a chat room, and a blog.

  • Instant Messenger – You can direct message (DM) a user, and the message is private. You can Tweet and use the person’s Twitter handle in the body of the tweet. The recipient will see the tweet in their Twitter notifications. If they have the Twitter app installed on their smartphone, they will be immediately informed of the message. (Great way to get a recruiter’s attention!)
  • Chat Room – All public tweets are visible and searchable. I will cover searching Twitter in my next post! Due to the fact that everything is visible, there are things called Twitter Chats. I wrote about Twitter chats in my post Baby Boomers and Twitter? – How about a Twitter chat! It is safe!
  • Blog – Users can post a message and a link. This is how many recruiters inform the public of new job postings.

Twitter Lists

Twitter lists are a lists of twitter users. When you view the list, you will see only Tweets from the users in the list. This is a great way to filter and group Tweets.

I recommend you create Twitter lists for each company on your target list. This way, you can quickly scan the Tweets for any given company.

Twitter Lists can be public or private. You will want to make your target job search Twitter lists private. We do not want to disclose to your boss or anyone else that you are watching these companies.

Watch the video below to see how to create Twitter lists:

Once the list is created you can add Twitter users/handles to these Twitter lists. I recommend you add at least one from the following categories:

  • Corporate – Companies will often have one Twitter Id where they will Tweet out news. You may find they have one specifically for hiring, or for a specific region or division of the company.
  • Recruiters – Search LinkedIn for recruiters. Add any recruiters that tweet out jobs.
  • Hiring Managers – Search LinkedIn for managers of the business area where you want to get hired. Add any managers that use Twitter to the list.
  • Executives or Thought Leaders – Find key executives in the target companies and add them to the list.

Watch the following video on how to add Twitter handles to Twitter Lists from these different categories.

Check each list every few days. Depending on the frequency of tweeting, you may have to check more often.

You do not need to tweet, but retweeting or responding to these tweets is a great way to get the attention of the people on your list…which is the whole idea behind the targeted job search!

Try this: Click on following link to Tweet: I learned all about how to use Twitter Lists in the Targeted Job Search from @careerpivot

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

8 Best Baby Boomer Career Websites

Best Baby Boomer Career Websites

Career WebsitesGood career websites that focus on baby boomers are few and far between. Recently, Hannah Morgan, The Career Sherpa, published her list of the Best Job Search Websites 2015.

Of course, Career Pivot made the list in the over 50 category. There was only one other website in that category, Kerry Hannon’s website. Kerry regularly writes for Forbes, AARP, and PBS Next Avenue.

When Career Pivot made the Forbes 2013 Top Career Website list, I wrote a post where I dissected the list, and was very disappointed—there were only three career websites that focused on baby boomers.

career websites

Last week, Career Pivot also made the list of Top 100 Software Developer Blogs for 2015.

Let me give you my top 8 baby boomer career website list!

Top 8 Baby Boomer Career Websites

1 – Career Pivot

Okay, I am being self serving, but Career Pivot is the only website that has made just about every list.

2 – Next Avenue

NextAvenue.org is owned by PBS. This website was launched in 2012 to serve the baby boomer community exclusively. It focuses on many issues that baby boomers are facing, not just career-related.

3 – Life Reimagined

Life Reimagined was launched by AARP starting in 2012 and relaunched in 2014. AARP is very late to the career market, but is making a good effort to address the needs of the baby boomer community.

4 – Kerry Hannon

KerryHannon.com is a place where you will find all of Kerry’s materials. Kerry writes for Forbes, AARP, and PBS Next Avenue. You might say that Kerry is a pioneer in this field.

 5 – My Lifestyle Career

MyLifeStyleCareer.com is a creation of Nancy Collamer. Nancy is the author of Second-Act Careers: 50+ Ways to Profit from Your Passions During Semi-Retirement. What I love about Nancy’s book is that it lays your possibilities out in bite size chunks that are easily digestible. Her blog is full of great ideas.

6 – Encore.org

Encore.org was created prior to the onset of the Great Recession. Their mission statement says it all:

Encore.org is building a movement to tap the skills and experience of those in midlife and beyond to improve communities and the world.

7 – 40PlusCareerGuru

40PlusCareerGuru.blogspot.com is the creation of my dear friend Neil Patrick. Neil is like most of you. He was part of a redundancy (he is from the UK, so I need to use the funny language they use), and now works for himself. Neil started his blog in order to brand himself, and he has done a fabulous job.

8 – John Tarnoff – Boomer Reinvention

 JohnTarnoff.com is the creation of John Tarnoff! Specifically, you will want to check out John’s blog.

A career development coach, speaker, university educator and former media/entertainment executive, John Tarnoff focuses on personal and professional transformation across generations – reintegrating the Boomer Generation workforce into the rapidly evolving 21st century workplace, and developing programs, opportunities and curriculum to support new generations of leaders and entrepreneurs.

Why not the top 10?

My intention was to give you a top 10 list, but I could not find 10 well established websites!

Let me point to two other websites that are either new or under new ownership

ItsAllAboutMe.Today – Midlife Enpowerment

ItsAllAboutMe.Today – This is a brand new website that was developed by another friend Hugh Taylor. Check it out.

Boomers Next Step

BoomersNextStep.com – Jenni Proctor bought this domain and has re-launched it. Check it out.

Am I missing something? If so, comment below and tell me about any other Baby Boomer Career Websites you think are valuable.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Twitter – 4 Reasons Baby Boomers Should Care

Baby Boomers and Twitter

twitterI know you are thinking, “Why should I be on Twitter?” You see all those hashtags #whattheheckarethesethings when you watch just about any news program or sports event on television.

I am going to give you four reasons to get on Twitter to help manage your career!

Staying Current

In 2013, I turned on my television set moments after Asiana flight 214 crashed in San Francisco. I went to Twitter and searched for information on the crash at SFO airport. I immediately found pictures that were taken moments before from the crash site.

Most news channels get breaking news from Twitter.

If you want to be current on technology, the companies on your target list, or advances within your industry, you really need to be on Twitter.

Communicating

Have you tried to communicate via e-mail with a hiring manager or recruiter and not gotten a response? One of the best ways to get someone’s attention is to mention them in a tweet on Twitter.  Will Thomson, a recruiter I mentor, wrote the following in his post on How to Impress a Recruiter:

As a candidate, you have to recognize what recruiters are doing and saying. I had Matt Arch  send me a note on Twitter the other day that blew me away. Why did he intrigue me? He first went to LinkedIn and researched my profile. He found that I was in Austin and I recruited Sales and Marketing individuals. He then found my twitter handle on Linkedin. Once he found my twitter handle, he sent me a note saying he was looking to relocate to Austin and sent me a hyperlink to his resume.

If you want to get someone’s attention, send them a tweet with a link to your LinkedIn profile or resume.

If I want to get someone’s attention quickly, I will send them a tweet. If they have Twitter on their smart phone, it will immediately inform them of my tweet. There is no better way to get a rapid response!

If you tweet @careerpivot , it will come up on my iPhone and I will respond!

Have you heard of a Tweetchat or Twitter Chat? I wrote previously about these events in my post – Baby Boomers and Twitter? – How about a Twitter chat! It is safe!

Think of these as community events on Twitter—similar to a chat room. I attend two of these events (#blogchat and #linkedinchat) just about every week.

I can say that I have developed some very good professional relationships with members of these groups though I have never met any of them face to face.

There are a number of websites that list a schedule of Twitter chats. Check out TweetReports.com’s list.

Show That You Are Tech Savvy

I hear it all the time, baby boomers cannot keep up with all of the new technology. If you want to dispel this myth, then start using Twitter.

Are you going to embrace Twitter?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

 ————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my personal branding white paper – Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group