Are You In Control of Your Career

Are You In Control of Your Career

in_controlDo you feel like you are in control of your career? For many of you, I am sure the answer will be no.

If you read the two previous posts in this series, Social Disruption – How Job Search has Changed and The Traditional Job Search is Dead – R.I.P. , you know that, if you are following a traditional job search, you are not in control!

Do You Have a Career Development Plan?

Most of you who came up through corporate ladder will remember development plans. You sat down with your boss every year to document your career trajectory. When was the last time you did this?

My last career development plan was in the late 1990s when I still worked for IBM. I have been in control of my career choices ever since.

Reflect back over the last 15 years of your career. Who has been in control?

  • Have you been laid off or unemployed?
  • When you lost your job, did you see it coming?

It is time to take control and be prepared to change jobs every 2-3 years. That does not mean you will change jobs every 2-3 years, rather, that you will be prepared.

The New Development Plan

In previous posts, I have written that you should take time to reflect on your career twice a year. If you live in the United States, two easy dates to use are July 4th and January 1st. Both of these are holidays.

You should update your resume and LinkedIn profile twice a year based on your reflections.

You should also create a development plan which needs to contain the following sections:

  • Career Goals – Short Term (1 year) and Long Term (3 Years)
  • Current Standing – Access where you stand right now in your career. Include skills and areas of expertise. Where do you see pitfalls that could be an issue in the coming year?
  • Formulate Options – Determine what skills you need to develop. What skills will become obsolete? What steps can you take to develop or enhance your skills?
  • Develop an Action Plan – Develop a step by step plan to reach your goals. Make sure that all of your steps adhere to the SMART acronym. Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound.

Your development plan is be a living document and should not exceed 3 years. No one can predict what the economy will look like past 3 years.

In Control of Your Career

If you want to be in control of your career in the era of Social Disruption of Job Search, you must be proactive.

If you are not regularly assessing your industry directions and how your skills fit, you are not in control.

Have you been in control of your career?

Comment below and tell us your story about being in control of your career.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for August 15

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Social Media

Baby Boomer

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

You Have a Job Offer – Now What?

Job Offer

job_offerYou just received a verbal job offer from the recruiter. What are your next steps?

If you have been following the Negotiator Job Search Series, you know the following:

  • Keep your emotions in check – a lot of things can go wrong from here.
  • The real decision maker – who are you really going to be negotiating the final details with?
  • The hiring manager’s pain points – why do they want you and how badly do they need you?
  • Why you want this position – are you really being offered the job you interviewed for? Does this position meet the criteria of your mission and purpose statement?

Verbal Job Offer

Now, the verbal job offer has arrived. Because of this, you need to put your negotiator hat back on. Listen carefully to the details and ask probing questions about them.

However, agree to nothing. Do not get excited. Keep your emotions in check. Tell them that you want to evaluate the entire offer once you have it as a job formal offer on paper.

Ask the hiring manager how long should it take to get a formal offer. I had one client who waited two months to receive the formal offer. This was exceptionally painful because my client was unemployed. (By the way, this was from a large, sexy tech company that has an aura of a great company to work for. It is just an aura!)

Formal Job Offer

Finally, the formal job offer arrives via FedEx or UPS. You are all excited. Remember: keep your emotions in check!

  • Health insurance, vacation or paid time off(PTO) policy, retirement/401(k) and any other benefit should be read carefully.
  • Evaluate the base pay, bonus structure, sign on bonus, stock options, and other forms of compensation.

How do these compare to your expectations?

Get very clear about what you want in benefits and financial compensation.

Negotiations

I always believe to start with vacation or PTO. If you have a vacation planned in the next year, put that on the table first. This is particularly true if you have incurred airfare, hotel, or any other non-refundable expenses.

Ask how vacation or PTO is accrued. It may be possible to have your vacation or PTO account filled with one or two weeks credit before you start. Yes, I have seen this happen.

What do you want that is not in the job offer?

Do you want to bring your dog to work?

Do you want to work from home?

Will you be reimbursed for cell phone use or will they provide a cell phone?

Do you want a standing or walking desk?

Get all of these issues out of the way before you start negotiating compensation. You will find if they really want you, they will honor most of these requests.

Salary and Other Compensation

This is where I am a contrarian. Determine what you want in base salary, bonus, and any other form of compensation. If the offer is low in any area, ask them to sweeten the deal. They will almost always ask you:

How much do you want?

Your response will be:

I want to be compensated fairly.

DO NOT give them a number.

You know their pain points. It is time to pull out what you have learned and explain to them why they need you.

What is you BATNA?

Best Alternative To No Agreement (BATNA). What if they will not give you what you want. Be ready with a plan. Do you walk away? Do you take the less than optimal offer?

By the time they have made the effort to send you a formal job offer, they have determined they want you. You are in the driver’s seat. They will not want to watch you walk away.

Negotiations Start before You Start Your Job Search

If you go back to the beginning of the Negotiator Job Search Series, I told you that negotiations start when you create your mission and purpose statement. You write the mission and purpose statement before you even start the job search. Everything you have accomplished in the job search has prepared you for negotiating the final job offer.

Are you ready to act like a negotiator in your next job search?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

The Traditional Job Search is Dead – R.I.P.

Traditional Job Search is Dead

job-search-deadThe days of looking online for a job posting, applying for the job, and then getting an interview are long gone.

In my last post, Social Disruption: How Job Search has Changed, I discussed why the current hiring process is broken.

If you want to stay employed, you will need to use new strategies and tactics to deal with the disruption that social media and technology has had on the job search.

Many companies no longer post positions publicly. Depending on who you talk to, 50-80% of positions are no longer listed. Check out these articles:

Risk Mitigation in the Hiring Process

When a company needs to fill a position, they want to mitigate risk.

The safest hire is an internal candidate. Many large companies may post their position publicly, even though they already have an internal candidate.

The next safest hire is an external candidate with a referral from an existing employee. A candidate with an employee referral will almost always called for an interview. Employee referrals are golden.

These two groups of candidates make up over 90% of hires.

Does this change your attitude and strategy for your job search?

Let’s discuss a new strategy that I call the Social Job Search.

Social Job Search Defined

There are a few clearly defined steps to the Social Job Search:

  1. Defining your personal brand—I have a new E-Book titled, “Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What it is, how to manage it, and why it’s no longer optional” that should be out in September of 2015. Who are you? What talents and skills do you want to the world to know about?
  2. Implement your personal brand—Create an on-line presence using LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, e-books, blog posts, and other mediums that promote your personal brand. This is all about making it easy to be found.
  3. Build a target list of companies that potentially need your services to solve their problems. Who do you want to work for next?
  4. Network strategically with recruiters, hiring managers, and potential peers at your target companies. Make yourself known to people who can either hire you or affect the decision to hire you.
  5. Investigate your target companies—Are these companies a good place to work? Is their public reputation true or just a facade? You will need to properly vet these companies.
  6. Negotiate the hiring process—Act like a corporate negotiator to discover what the real issues are that the company is having so you can properly position yourself to be hired. I defined this process in the negotiator job search series.

I will be expanding on this process in detail in the series The Social Job Search. How to use social media to attract hiring companies to you.

The days of the traditional job search are over. May it Rest in Peace!

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for August 8

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Social Media

Baby Boomer

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

Experienced is the new Entry-Level

rewiredExperienced is the new Entry-Level

These are turbulent times in the business world – for companies and individuals alike. With change comes the need to think differently; and in no area is this truer than in workforce matters. The shifts in the demographic landscape and the economy have dictated the need for a new hiring paradigm that gives employers and individuals flexibility and efficiency.

According to a Deloitte Talent Strategy Survey (“Talent Edge 2020”), 83 percent of respondents acknowledge that significant improvements are needed in their talent programs. What is the answer? Flexible workforce solutions that put qualified people to work and help employers meet their corporate objectives.

Companies have been tapping into internal candidates for years, but what about experienced professionals who have left a company or industry due to layoffs, retirement, or personal reasons. The “Alumni Workforce,” introduced by rewired.solutions, is made up of skilled professionals who are ready to reengage (and get rewired!) They have the skills and don’t need extensive training – they just need work!

Baby Boomers and Gen X-ers are completely disrupting the existing work model. Working much later into their lives, out of desire or out of need, these veteran employees looking for part-time, contract-based, or even full-time work – and they aren’t looking to compete with millennials for entry-level work. They have more experience in the workforce, and in many cases at just one or a few companies.

“A company wanting to leverage the investment it has made in human capital seems so obvious, but nothing like this is in place,” says rewired CEO, Tim Hearon. “We are helping individuals cash in on that need and rewire themselves back into workforce in a way that works for them.”

Are you a Professional Alumni looking to rewire your career? Register for free to start finding job matches at https://rewired.solutions/

Rewired is changing the way companies hire by connecting experienced professionals with employers seeking cost-effective and flexible alternatives.

Lauren_SlivaThis post was written by Lauren Silva.  Lauren is a Marketing Consultant and blogger for rewired. A graduate from the George Washington University’s School of Media & Public Affairs with a degree in Journalism & Mass Communications, she has experience in online and print marketing, as well as graphic design.

Note from Marc Miller: I like what this startup is doing. It is worth taking a look.

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for August 1

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Social Media

Baby Boomer

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

Who is Really Making the Hiring Decision?

Who makes the final decision in the hiring process?

Decision MakerWho makes the decision to hire you? It may seem obvious, but it’s often a shell game.

You would think it was the hiring manager, but does he or she really have the final say?

There is a exact correlation in understanding who is the decision maker in hiring and who makes the decision when negotiating any sort of business transaction.

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

WHO’S CALLING THE shots? Who are the real decision makers within the adversary’s bureaucracy? This might seem, at first glance, to be a fairly mundane issue, but it’s not. It is a critically important issue in any negotiation, even though you can read book after book on the subject and never find a single acknowledgment that the question of who’s calling the shots demands immediate attention. How can you create vision and paint the pain effectively without knowing who the decision makers for the adversary really are? You can’t, so the decision-making process within your adversary’s organization must be discovered and understood at the very beginning of the negotiation, or as soon thereafter as possible.

You need to know—at the beginning of the hiring process—who is calling the shots and who can make the final hiring decision.

Who is calling the shots?

In 2006, I left teaching high school math and decided to try my hand at working for a non-profit. In most small to medium non-profits, the decision maker is often the CEO, Executive Director, or even the Board of Directors. I attended a non-profit conference specifically to target the Executive Director or CEO of five non-profits. I met face to face with all five.

The following week, I was offered an interview for a junior level corporate fund raising position at the local Jewish Community Center (JCC). You have to understand, I am not Jewish, but I had a lot of business connections and I was a JCC member. I was a really odd fit for the position.

I interviewed and was subsequently offered the position. The hiring manager was NOT the decision maker. I had convinced the CEO that I was worth taking a chance on. It was a new endeavor that the organization had not pursued in the past. The CEO was the real decision maker, yet I never interviewed with him.

I lasted a year before I resigned. Being a non-Jew as the face of a Jewish organization is…interesting.

If I had not pursued the CEO who made the hiring decision, I would have never been given the opportunity to interview. By the way, I learned I could not work for a non-profit.

Recruiters and Hiring Decisions

Recruiters and other HR professionals do not make hiring decisions. They can hinder or block you from getting hired, but they do not make the decision to hire you.

Recently, one of my clients was told the following by a recruiter, “The hiring manager, Mary, is not going to like that you cannot start until September. This is a deal breaker.”

My client calmly told the recruiter, “Please relay my requirements to Mary and let me know what she says”

The recruiter was expressing her opinion, but she was not the decision maker. She took the message to the hiring manager. A September start date did not make the hiring manager happy, but she was willing to wait.

If a recruiter acts like the decision maker, you need to tell them to pass your messages directly to the hiring manager. Stay cool, calm and collected in telling them what you want.

Who do you need to impress?

The decision to hire you may be made by a key member or members of the team.

One local Austin company has a consensus based hiring process. The entire team has to agree on who to hire. Think of this like a jury. Everyone needs to agree.

During the interview process, you need to determine who the lone juror might be that could prevent you from being hired. In reality, they become the key decision maker in your not being hired.

As you do your homework on the company, it is important for you understand the hiring process. It will be key to ask probing questions on how they make hiring decisions. Start this dialog during the initial phone screen.

When I have needed to make a hiring decision at both of my tech startups, I relied on the opinions of my team. I will readily admit I am not good at interviewing. The true decision makers on who got hired were my team and not me.

Explore the Past

Who really made the decision to hire you in the past jobs? Think about it.

Was it always the hiring manager, or did a key team member make the decision?

Was the key decision maker higher up in the management chain?

In your current job search, who do you need to convince that you are the right person for the job?

This is 9th post in the Negotiator Job Search Series. You can read the rest of the series here.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Social Disruption – How Job Search has Changed

Social Disruption

social_disruptionSocial media has caused widespread disruption of the hiring process.

The hiring process is very broken.

Anyone who has searched for a job or has had to hire someone knows this is true. The primary culprit of this disruption is social media and technology.

Let me give you some history.

Twenty Years Ago – 1995

Twenty years ago, when you wanted to find a new job, you looked in the newspaper or professional journal. The Internet was in its infancy.

You filled out a paper application or faxed your resume. Yes…that dreaded fax machine.

You then sat by the phone (remember the ones with cords?) for a phone call from the recruiter or a hiring manager. Confirmations and rejections came on paper—definitely not texts. Remember those days?

Ten Years Ago – 2005

Ten years ago is when the disruption started. Social media was in its infancy.

You searched for jobs online. Monster.com was created in 1999. Indeed.com was created in 2005. Most companies listed their jobs online. Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) were being used by most major corporations. Jobvite.com, one of the major providers of ATS technology, was incorporated in 2003.

The hiring process was automated. You could find job postings online. You filled out applications via online forms. You waited for an e-mail, rather than a phone call, to see if you would be interviewed.

Nothing had really changed in ten years, except that the process was automated.

The problem was that it became too easy to apply for jobs. Companies were inundated with applications. This has been growing over the last ten years. When a job was posted in 2013, companies received an average of 100 applications. In 2014, this had grown to 180 applications per posted position.

Today – 2015

Depending on who you talk to, 50-80% of jobs are never posted or advertised.

Why are so few jobs listed online? There is no need. Posting a job on LinkedIn, Monster, or Careerbuilder is expensive. Why post a job when you can source your needs instead?

Sourcing?

Wikipedia defines Sourcing as:

Sourcing is a talent management discipline which is focused on the identification, assessment and engagement of skilled worker candidates through proactive recruiting techniques. Professionals specializing in sourcing are known primarily as Sourcers; but also Internet Recruiters, Recruiting Researchers or Talent Scouts.

Sourcing specialists search the Internet for the best talent. They look in:

  • Social Media – Primarily LinkedIn, but also Facebook, and Twitter. Social media provides the bulk of candidates.
  • Resume databases – Monster, CareerBuilder,  Indeed and other websites. Companies have been searching these websites for years.
  • Applicant Track Systems (ATS) – Many companies have collected hundreds of thousands of resumes within their ATS databases.
  • Specialty websites like Github.com where users can display work product. Think of this like Pinterest for software.

Companies may still post jobs on their website for a variety of reasons:

  • Corporate policy – They may have already identified an internal candidate, but they always post the position publicly.
  • To collect resumes for future positions. The position may not be real, but they want find out who is qualified.

Just because a position is posted publicly does not mean there is a real opportunity to be hired.

Qualified Interested Available (QIA)

Sourcing is difficult because of the QIA.

Each sourcing professional needs to create a pool of qualified candidates.

Whether they are sorting through a stack of resumes or a collection of LinkedIn profiles, selection of the most qualified candidates is difficult. This is where hiring is really broken. Often, candidates are deemed qualified based on the types and quantity of keywords they stuff into their resume or LinkedIn profile.

Ain’t that a great way to pick a the most qualified candidate?

Next, sourcers take the pool of qualified candidates and contact them to see if they are interested.

Have you received an e-mail or phone call from a recruiter asking whether you are interested in a particular position? My guess is that, when you do, most of the time you say no. This might be because you truly are not interested or you are thinking, “Leave me alone!”

Lastly, they need to find out who is available when and where they need them. Now they have a list of candidates to interview.

Wow—this is broken!

The chance that the most qualified candidate was overlooked or ignored is really high. It could be:

  • The resume or LinkedIn profile did not properly demonstrate or display the candidate well.
  • When the recruiter called to see if there is some interest, the candidate was having a bad day.
  • The recruiter did a lousy job of communicating with the candidate due to cultural or generational differences.
  • So many other reasons that my head spins thinking about it.

The Social Job Search

How do you fix the broken hiring system?

You can’t.

You can make yourself into an excellent passive candidate.

You publish enough about yourself and your skills that you are easy to find.

You develop the right relationships with the right people so that you are considered for positions that you want.

You do this by leveraging social media to your advantage.

This is the beginning of a series that I am calling The Social Job Search. How to use social media to attract hiring companies to you.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for July 25

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Baby Boomers

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work