LinkedIn Endorsements Updated – FINALLY!

LinkedIn Endorsements

Linkedin EndorsementsMany of you have grown tired of LinkedIn Endorsements and being prompted to endorse your connections. Many of you have also grown tired of getting LinkedIn endorsements from people you have never worked with or getting LinkedIn endorsements for skills that you do not have like underwater basket weaving. (I do know of someone who received this endorsement). That is changing!

LinkedIn Endorsements Changes

If you edit your profile and scroll down to the “Skills & Endorsements” section and select edit You will be given four options.

I want to be endorsed

For most of us we want to be endorsed. Hey why wouldn’t I want to be endorsed?

If you are a financial adviser or any other position that is heavily regulated, they cannot be endorsed. This has been a real problem for financial advisers. Do not endorse your stock broker, insurance agent, fee based financial adviser…you create problems for them!

Do you want your connections to be prompted to endorse you? WOW that is a tough one. I have so many endorsements that the answer is probably no but…I am not sure on this one. I will leave the box checked for the time being.

This is one box that I will uncheck. I no longer want to be harassed to endorse my connections.

If I want to endorse someone I will explicitly go into their profile and endorse them. I have to do the same to make a recommendation.

If someone endorses me I still want know. Specifically, if they endorse me for a skill I do not possess I really want to know about it.

 Reorder Your Skills

It is a subtle change but you can now re-order your skills. Bring the skills that you want to LinkedIn endorsements to the top. This has two effects:

  1. Your connections will be prompted for the skills at the top of your list
  2. You will come up hirer is search rankings for the skills that you want to be found

Other LinkedIn Changes

There are a lot of other changes other than LinkedIn Endorsements that are coming.

 New LinkedIn Inbox

The inbox has been enhanced to be easier to use. For more information check out LinkedInExpert’s post.

New LinkedIn Groups Page

If you used the LinkedIn groups page in the past it has been fairly clumsy going in between groups. Now it has been greatly streamlined.

New LinkedIn Group Digest E-Mail Formats

If you belong to LinkedIn groups you may have noticed the changes to the digest e-mail formats. LinkedIn is currently beta-testing several formats and we will see which one wins.

LinkedIn Publisher

LinkedIn is opening up their publishing platform to everyone. Today, it is only for key influencers. They are slowly opening this up to everyone. Currently, you have to apply for early access. I applied several weeks ago and am still waiting for access.

LinkedInChat Tweetchat

If you want to stay up to date on changes to LinkedIn, participate in the weekly Tweetchat called LinkedInChat. This tweetchat is run by my friend Viveka von Rosen, aka @LinkedInExpert.  Her trusty sidekick, Steve Cassady, @SteveCassady is always there to assist.

I know the changes are happening fast and furious on LinkedIn right now. Hopefully, this update helps you keep up with how to create, manage and promote your personal brand.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

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Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

‘Court’ a Hiring Manager Without Seeming Like a Creep

Use LinkedIn to get on the radar of your target companies.

LinkedInIn the professional world, much of what is experienced is passive recruiting – where recruiters are out looking for talent among those who are already employed (and not job-seeking). This practice is similar to being courted, which produces good feelings. Though one may still turn down the offer, the fact remains – it is still nice to be pursued.

(This article originally appeared on US News Money and Careers Section February 27, 2014)

Many professionals are starting to take overt actions in preparation for this “courtship.” They begin by asking which companies they would like to be a part of and which cultural dynamics line up with their own.

Build a target list of companies. The first preparatory step is to create a list of companies that hire candidates with your skill-set. Which companies might hire you?

Utilizing LinkedIn’s advanced search helps many people research applicable job titles, highlighted skills and referenced certifications. An example of this is a project manager who has PMP certification. He or she can generate a LinkedIn advanced search where the last name contains PMP while at the same time specifying the desired location using zip code.

Look at local business journals and newspapers for their annual best places to work reports. Investigate these lists carefully, as a company that is great to work for today may not be one tomorrow. Company culture is an ever-shifting dynamic, and many who have worked at these places would not agree that they are ideal. There is a reason why “past performance does not necessarily predict future results” is a popular sentiment.

Vet the target list. A list is not worth much unless it’s acted upon, so the next step is just that. Connect with a target company’s current employees by requesting lunch or coffee meetings. Try to gain a clear understanding of their satisfaction. They may even be willing to introduce you to their colleagues.

Conversely, it is worthwhile to also speak to people who have left the company. Finding these people on LinkedIn by using advanced search and selecting “past but not current” in the company field makes this process easy. These folks are often the most honest about company culture, and are therefore worth the time and effort to pursue.

Remember that building a company list takes time and periodic re-evaluation. Contact lists should be grown with care and precision, adding to them maybe once every week or two.

Take this concept even further by asking for an introduction to the company recruiter. The above steps should be taken when one is not looking for a job, thus creating a more open conversation flow. The whole point is to broaden your network now so that you know where opportunities may exist in the future.

Promote a personal brand. The next step in this process is to promote a personal brand. Who needs to know that you know your stuff? When answering this question, also consider where people spend time on social media. It might be Facebook or Twitter, and don’t forget the professional value of LinkedIn. Most professionals and companies have profiles on this website, and this fact, combined with the extensive advanced search capabilities, makes LinkedIn an incredibly helpful tool in sharing personal brand. It’s wise to join the same groups that people on your list have joined, so that you may contribute actively and establish yourself as having the character and vision your personal brand exemplifies.

Twitter’s list feature is also good for tracking the activity of those with whom you care to associate. Systematically retweet and favorite some of their compelling content. In this manner, you will be noticed without being considered a stalker.

This concept of being where your target list of people are is no different than how teens hang out where their friends or crushes are. It improves the chances of being noticed in a less aggressive manner. You don’t want to appear to be a jerk.

Hiring managers at your target companies will learn that you know your stuff. This is a slow, methodical process. There is a tremendous parallel between finding a date and finding a new job. We all want to be asked out.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

(This article originally appeared on US News Money and Careers Section February 27, 2014)

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Social Networking for Business Success – Book Review

Social Networking for Business Success

businessAre you starting a business? Are you running an existing business?

If you answered yes to either of those questions, you are probably thinking about how you could use social networking to promote, sell, or get visibility for your company and products.

This is the book for you!

I am a big fan of Miriam Salpeter, Keppie Careers, and Hannah Morgan, Career Sherpa. When they released their book, Social Network for Business Success, last September, I immediately bought a copy. What I like about the book is that Miriam and Hannah wrote a book they wished they’d had when they started their own businesses.

The introduction states:

“We wrote it to be useful whether you are just thinking of starting a business “on the side,” or if you have a company that’s doing well but are ready to launch it to the next level.”

What I found useful in the book is, besides giving you guidance in using Social Media and doing business in general via the Internet, they direct you to resources that they have found useful. I highlighted sections in just about every chapter that I plan to go back and review.

Useful Online Resources

For example, in chapter 3, What Social Media Does For Your Business, I found the section called Review Third-Party Twitter List a valuable resource. They listed a variety of online tools/websites that made it easy to identify key players in your field.

In the same chapter, they have a section titled Find And Own Your Name Online. They listed two websites (KnowEm.com and Namechk.com) that you can use to research the availability of names on hundreds of social networks. I found a lot of social “real estate” where I needed to claim my name!

Offline Resources

In chapter 7, called Research the Competition, there is a section called Professional Organizations Who Help Small Businesses. What impressed me here is that they have a section on Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs). These SBDCs are typically housed in Universities but are funded by the U.S. Small Business Advisory (SBA). We have one of these organizations at Texas State University, and I have sent numerous clients to them for help with their business plans and mentorship.

Other Chapters

There are chapters on:

  • Creating Your Website
  • How to Choose the Best Social Networks for your Business
  • Creating a Buzz for your Business
  • Social Sharing – Tools and Applications
  • Monitoring Your Activity – Tools and Tips
  • and lots more!

What I like about Social Network for Business Success is it does not tell how to do it but directs you to the resources that will tell you how to do it!

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

3 Key Elements of your LinkedIn Photograph

LinkedIn Photograph

LinkedIn PhotographYour LinkedIn photograph is the first thing that most people notice when they view your profile. It also shows up next to your name and headline when people conduct searches on LinkedIn. It is often the number one factor in whether people click to view your profile.

What does your LinkedIn photograph say about you?

What does it say about your personal brand?

Let’s discuss three key factors of your photograph to consider in establishing your personal brand.

Framing and clothing

Consider what you want people to see in your photograph:

Do you want people to see your whole upper torso or do you want just a headshot? If you want the whole upper torso, the selection of clothing is much more critical. If you are someone who, like myself, does not have taste in colors, find a professional or a friend who can help you select an appropriate outfit.

You need to understand the physical characteristic of the LinkedIn photograph. The photograph should be square and be a maximum of 4MB in size. If the photograph is not square, you will be given an opportunity to crop the photo.

What do you want to appear in the photograph? A good example is the photograph in my LinkedIn Profile.

The original photograph was taken of me from the waist up and was not square. Therefore, I cropped it to show with as much of the upper torso as possible. I am quite tall, 6’4” and thin. I want you to get a good feeling when you see the picture.

Scott IngramAnother example is the photograph of my friend Scott Ingram. Notice that the photo is a tight shot of Scott’s face. Also, notice the angle—Scott is looking up at the camera. Scott is an expert sales person and wants to appear approachable.

Nando PhotographAnother example is my friend Nando Cabán-Méndez. Nando is a creative, and his picture conveys that. Not everyone likes this photo, but it attracts those who he wants as clients. Plus, I can actually recognize Nando when I meet him in person. This is a critical factor in choosing the photograph you use on LinkedIn. Do not over edit your photograph on Photoshop!

Background

What background do you want?

Do you want to appear to be outdoors?

Do you want to appear to be in a crowd?

My LinkedIn photograph was taken on a green screen. I actually have three backgrounds that can be interchanged. The background has an easily recognizable bridge in Austin Texas. Most who live in Austin will immediately know this was taken in Austin. Do you want to create a feeling that you are in some location?

I also have backgrounds of concrete and wood paneling. Be careful that your outfit will need to be compatible with each background.

Chin line

The ultimate factor in whether you will look good in your LinkedIn profile photograph is your chin line. You do not want any double chins and wrinkles.

I know, I know—you are saying, “Really, chin line?” Stay with me on this point.

Watch the video – It’s all about the Jaw!, which is about 15 minutes in length, to learn from Photographer Peter Hurley, about how to make your chin line look great.

Use your LinkedIn photograph to put yourself in a position that makes the kind of impression you want to project through your personal brand.

What are you next steps?

How do you want to be branded by your photograph?

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Curating Your Career by Creating a Career Scrapbook

Curating Your CareerWhat the heck is curating your career?

Curating your career is collecting information, maybe projects you were involved with, awards you won, campaigns you created and putting it all together in one place in a way that lets people visually comprehend what your career has been about. It’s a little like keeping a scrapbook. You can also include stuff that’s related to your career but not just about you, that helps the social angle.

As a child of the 1960′s and 1970′s, when we had real photographs and we received in depth news via newspapers and magazines we would collect items that we wanted to remember or maybe show off.

We kept scrapbooks. You know the ones that your grandmother wanted to show you or the ones you created for a school project.

I had a scrapbook of newspaper articles where my name appeared. My last two years in high school I was a pretty good quarter miler and my name would appear in the local newspaper every time I finished 1st, 2nd or 3rd in a major meet. If I won, my name might appear in an article. Pretty good stuff for a teenager in the 70′s. Pictures and articles went into my scrapbook.

Your Career Scrapbook

I have been blogging over the last couple of months on using social media to manage your career.  I have been discussing using blogs, LinkedIn and social media in general to promote your personal brand. One way of showcasing your talent or promote your personal brand is to curate content online or create a scrapbook of interesting webpages, pictures, articles,…

I have been using a product called RebelMouse. RebelMouse allows you to create an online scrapbook. I created the Career Pivot BoomerJobTips page on the Career Pivot website using RebelMouse. I have set it up to automatically pull content from my CareerPivot Twitter feed, other users Twitter feeds, RSS feeds, and FaceBook pages.

At this point you can rearrange the content however you would like by going to the native BoomerJobTips RebelMouse page. It is just like having an online scrapbook.

I found this a fascinating way for people to view content that I have selected. They do not need to be on FaceBook or Twitter. (Yes, a lot of Baby Boomer guys are not on Facebook or Twitter!) Oh by the way it is free or at least for now it is free for the basic features.

Did you have a scrapbook as a kid?  Do you like finding and collecting interesting articles on the Internet? Are you curating your career and did not know it?

Start curating your career and promote it among your friends.

(Disclosure – I have no financial connection to RebelMouse other than being a happy customer.)

This post is part of a new regular series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Finding Keywords to Manage Your Career [Video]

KeywordsEveryone talks about keywords but how do you find them?

How do you know which keywords you should be using in your LinkedIn profile and other social media profiles?

The keywords you want to use are those keywords that recruiters and hiring managers are using in LinkedIn and Google searches.

First, what are the keywords and keyword phrases your target companies, industries and/or profession are using today? These keywords and keyword phrases can change over time. You need to perform research on keywords on a regular basis.

The method I recommend is using word cloud tools like Wordle and Tagcrowd. Word cloud tools take all the text you enter and make a visual image with the words. The largest words are the ones that make a pretty picture from the text you enter. The most common words will appear larger in the picture.

Where do you get the text?

If you are looking for a job, cut and paste all of the text from a job description into the word cloud tool. Reduce the number of words to use in the word cloud to ten. You will now have a picture of the most common words that the company used. Good chance those are the most important words to that company.

Now you need to go back into the original text and search on how these words are used. What exact keyword phrases did the company use?

Watch this video to see a demonstration on how to find keywords in a job description.

Clearly, management was the most common word. The most common phrases were learning management system, and project management. Follow this same procedure on at least the top five words in each job description. Find at least five job descriptions for similar positions to see if there is a pattern within the industry.

You can use this same process on:

  • Corporate web pages
  • Marketing collateral
  • White Papers
  • Facebook pages
  • Corporate LinkedIn Pages and Posts

You are looking for the language that your target audience is using. You should come up with a list of keywords and keyword phrases that you can use in your LinkedIn profile and other social media platforms. Basically, you’re giving them exactly what they’re looking for!

How do you know your keywords are working?

If you buy the most inexpensive LinkedIn premium business plan, you will be able to see the search terms that users are using to find your profile. Often you can get the first 30 days free.

Seed the keyword phrases that the companies you’re interested in are using into your own your LinkedIn profile. Periodically, check LinkedIn to see if there is any change in the search terms that your profile is found with.

I recommend you to re-evaluate your keywords at least once a year. Make note of any shift in keywords that your target companies, industries and/or profession are using.

Have you looked for keywords before?  Have you looked for keyword phrases? 

Will you now?

How will you use keywords to manage your career?

This post is part of a new regular series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

5 Ways Recruiters Will Find You – Guest Post

RecruiterThink about the word Recruiter for a minute.

What do you think about when you think of that word?

  • There are corporate recruiters who work for the company itself.
  • There are agency recruiters who help organizations find talent for companies other than itself for a fee.
  • There are executive recruiters or headhunters who are paid a very high fee to find “C” level talent for other organizations.

Have you ever been called by any of these?  Were you looking when you were called?

Recruiting has changed dramatically over the past twenty years.  The days of applying for a job online is NOT how most candidates are found anymore.  Recruiters should now be called “DETECTIVES”.   We use social media.  A LOT!!

EVERYTHING IS RESEARCH-ABLE.  Anything you have done in the past can now be found on the web.  If you ran in a race, we can find you.  If you have joined a meetup group for a technical skill, we will find you.

The number one thing to understand is that YOU WANT TO MAKE YOURSELF FOUND.  When a recruiter types in your name on Google, where will you come up on a search?  This is called SEO or Search Engine Optimization.  In today’s world, ANYTHING can be happen!! You like your job?  Great! You may lose it tomorrow and it may not be your fault.  Be ready!

Here are 5 Social Media avenues Recruiters do to find you:

  • Linkedin – Do you even realize the importance of Linkedin?  I know this is a big “duh” moment for most, but recruiters treat Linkedin like the bible.  Make sure your Linkedin profile is TOP KNOTCH.  Do you have a picture?  Not a picture of you at a party, but a real professional picture? If not, get this done ASAP!  Do you have a job title that people can find you?  Don’t put “product manager”, put “international expansion product manager”.  Make it clear and concise.   Do you have your skillet that CLEARLY states what you have done for each position?  If you are in sales, talk about your achievements, quota attained, accounts generated.  Treat it like a BREATHING RESUME.  Do you have endorsements?  Like it or not, endorsements are now Linkedin’s new recommendations and Recruiters DO view your endorsements.  Take a class; get the advice of an expert, but Linkedin is essential! Even if you don’t want to be found, you MUST present an image you would like the WORLD to see, because THEY DO!  Recruiters start here with almost EVERY search.  Although we may not contact you here, we want to find out WHO you are on Linkedin.
  • Facebook – Seriously.  Most everyone around the world has a Facebook account.  It is not going away.  We look at pictures.  We look at how you interact with others.  Facebook has been known as your “personal space” for so long, but don’t forget, we can find out A LOT about you even if you change your privacy settings.  It is okay to post pictures, or talk about your sports team.  We will couple this information with any other information before making a decision if you are a candidate.  Be careful what you say or do.  It is okay to mix business with professional here.  I encourage it.  Do it the right way though.
  • Twitter –  Okay – So I didn’t used to be a big believer in Twitter.  It is NOT going away.  140 Characters or less isn’t very much, but we will know more about you from what you tweet than most other avenues.  A lot of people STILL haven’t adapted to Twitter, but they will soon enough.  This is one of the main social media streams out there.  If you don’t have a twitter account, get one.  Use it.  You can follow people for a long time before you even tweet.  People talk a LOT on twitter.  Information can travel faster on Twitter than most other social media streams.
  • Google Plus-  Google has become increasingly important.  A majority of individuals have Gmail accounts.  Please get one if you don’t have one.  If you have an Android phone, most everything is tied to Google.  Many companies are using Gmail and Google rather than Microsoft Exchange because of the cost of Microsoft’s products.  Google plus is still in it’s infancy, but I do believe it could overtake many other social platforms in the future
  • Blogs-  The future of blogging is truly at a serious cross road.  On one hand, self-expression is embraced.  On the other hand, blogging is becoming seriously overcrowded with so-called experts.  If you DO write, please know what you are talking about and have something to ADD to society.  Many people don’t blog and are terrific at what they do.  If you do Blog, I will know A LOT about you and can tell if you are someone I want to pursue OR NOT.  We look at personal blog sites to find information and to decide whether or not to move forward.

Clean up your Social Media presence today. It is ESSENTIAL in today’s world. It is ESSENTIAL in finding your next job. EVEN IF YOU AREN’T LOOKING!! We will find you.

Author:

Will Thomson lives in Austin, Texas, and works for Rosetta Stone as the global sales and marketing recruiter. He has been in recruitment and sales for 20 years. He received his undergraduate from The University of Mississippi, and his Master’s Degree from St. Edward’s University in Austin. He has recruited some of the most sought-after talent around the globe, and is a regular blogger for the recruitment industry. Find him on Twitter @WillRecruits or at Bulls Eye Recruiting

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Should Baby Boomers Care About Their Personal Brand?

Personal BrandBaby Boomers, should you care about your Personal Brand?

I have written a couple of posts on this topic in the last few months:

Each time I have posted links to these posts on a variety of LinkedIn groups.

I have received comments like:

Why do I have to post on social media? Face to face communication is far more important.

You cannot build real relationships on Social Media!

First, that’s actually not true. I know many people who have met clients, customers and collaborators on social media such as Twitter and LinkedIn. They begin by commenting on one another’s posts, having online discussions and getting to know one another. Then, after a period of this, one or the other recommends they meet off line. Frequently, the relationship they built online proves to be something fruitful for both of them.

I also have many clients who work on large multi-national teams. They rarely meet face-to-face with their teammates. One of them has been running worldwide events for a large multi-national corporation from his man-cave for the last several years. His only interaction with his teammates was over the phone. And, like many people who get entrenched in a company, his business relationships were entirely with people who worked for the same multi-national corporation. It was an all-consuming culture.

He is now looking for employment. He knows his stuff. The problem is no one knows that he knows his stuff.  Had he been interacting with other people who do similar things in other companies, he would be a known entity. He would have connections outside of his own company.

Now he has to start promoting his skills. He has to be a salesman where he is the product.

Does this sound familiar? Had he been building relationships, reputation, answering questions for peers on social media, he would have a personal brand as an expert in this field.

That’s why Baby boomers should pay attention to Personal Brands!

We, baby boomers, were raised to be employees and were expected to go to work for father like corporations that would take care of us.

Those days are gone forever!

Dan Schawbel’s new book Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success is counter to the way many baby boomers were raised. Promote yourself? Many of us were taught that our work should speak for itself. Or we should let others speak for us. People who promoted themselves, unless they were really, really good at doing it subtly, were seen as arrogant.

The world has changed.

You now need to look at yourself as a product. A well-defined product that can be promoted worldwide!

That well-defined product is defined by your personal brand.

Can you afford to ignore developing and promoting your personal brand?

If you want to stay employed for the next twenty years (which many boomers will need to do) your personal brand cannot be ignored.

Should baby boomers care about their personal brand?

You tell me!

This post is part of a new regular series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

2 Social Media Tactics for Managing Your Career

Social Media TacticsWhat social media tactics do you use when managing your career?

Let’s get strategic! When managing your career on social media you are primarily looking for visibility, but with whom?

Tactic #1 – Identify key individuals

Typically, there are three kinds of people who you want to be visible to:

  • Those who can hire you. Hiring managers at your target companies.
  • Those who have direct influence in hiring you.  Future peers, key executives, recruiters or other influential people at the target company.
  • Those who have indirect influence in hiring you. Industry experts, influential consultants or administrative assistants of the hiring manager. Do not discount the power of some of the lowest paid people in an organization!

Build a list of 5-15 people at each organization who you would like to notice you, follow you and want to get to know you. Identify key individuals in your industry who can give you visibility.

You will want to research these people on LinkedIn and plan on connecting. I wrote in a previous post that this is like dating!  Be courteous, authentic, and follow good social rules.

Tactic #2 – Where do these key individuals hang out on social media?

For each individual you will want to look at his or her:

  • LinkedIn profile
  • Twitter account
  • Facebook account
  • Google + account

By looking at each you will be able to determine where they spend their time and effort as it relates to each given platform.

LinkedIn

What do they post on their profiles? Which LinkedIn groups do they belong to and in which are they the most active? Do they own one or more LinkedIn groups?

Twitter

How active are they on Twitter? How frequently do they post and do they post at specific times during the day? Who they follow? Who follows them? Are they on any Twitter lists?

Facebook

Do they use Facebook and can you view their timeline? What do they post on their Facebook page? Personal, business or both? I typically discourage people from friending people on Facebook for business purposes. I look at Facebook as a personal medium.  But if they leave their Facebook timeline visible, you can learn a lot about their outside interests.

Google+

Check out their account and see what they post. Google+ is a new platform that is growing. I have not used it enough to recommend any methods. Any suggestions?

Once, you have determined which platforms your key individuals use, develop a strategy to join LinkedIn groups, follow key individuals on Twitter, retweet tweets of your key individuals, and engage in conversations.

Be courteous and more importantly do not stalk! This is all about developing key business relationships online that you can then later take them offline so that you can manage your career.

What social media tactics do you use?

This post is part of a new regular series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

94% of companies are using social media to recruit

Social MediaAre you on Social Media for your career?

Social Media has become the predominant way companies promote their brand and find candidates.

Jobvite just release their e-book Jobvite’s 6th Annual Social Recruiting Survey Results.

There is a lot interesting data in this report.

  • 94% of recruiters use or plan to use social media in their recruitment efforts
  • 78% of recruiters have made a hire through social media

The key take away is you need to be promoting yourself on Social Media to properly manage your career.

Which social media platforms should you be on?

Surprise, surprise the top platforms are LinkedIn, FaceBook and Twitter! However, LinkedIn is used 94% of the time!

Social Media Platforms

The difference is LinkedIn is used in the hiring process and Twitter and Facebook are used more for brand awareness!

Recruiting FunnelCompanies are using Twitter and FaceBook to promote themselves. Where you need to be as a candidate is on LinkedIn.

What should you posting?

Please understand that when you post to social media it is publishing to the world. Even if you keep your social media settings locked down, your friends can always pass on what you wrote.

93% of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile!

Candidates Social ProfileI recently had a client who tweeted about his politically views on Twitter. They were not radical but pretty out from the center. I warned him that there may be certain people that will not want to buy his products because of those tweets.

I do not post anything about my views on politics, religion or just about anything else related to my personal life.

Oh by the way spell check your posts!

Use Social Media for Referrals

The report says the best quality candidates come from referrals, social media and then the corporate website.Referrals

Therefore, when you learn of a position seek out people in your network who can submit your resume! This is why you need to strategically network to build relationships ahead of time in your targeted markets.

Conclusion

Whether you like it or not Social Media recruiting is here to stay. Please take the time to download  Jobvite’s 6th Annual Social Recruiting Survey Results.

What is stopping you from developing a social media strategy for managing your career?

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist