BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for July 25

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Baby Boomers

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

What is the Real Budget for Your Job Search

Real Budget

budgetYou need to establish a budget for your job search. The budget will include time, energy, money, and emotion.

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

As with pain, “budget” in my system is almost a technical term. It is much more than your normal budget, much more than an itemization of projected costs,because the real price to be paid in the negotiation goes way beyond dollars and cents. Budget in the Camp System breaks down into three budgets that help us account for and control this real price in time-and-energy, money, and emotional investment. (I unite time and energy because it’s hard to spend one without spending the other as well.) The overall budget is a comprehensive, powerful tool, another means by which we can retain control in the negotiation by making certain that our investments are working for us, not against us.

Only the money budget is numerical. The other two employ a different kind of assessment, but one that we can keep up with quite accurately. My rough-and-ready formula for calculating the overall budget for a negotiation gives “time” a value of x, “energy” 2x, “money” 3x, and “emotion” 4x. Obviously, these are not empirically based numbers. They’re a way to drive home the point of relative importance. If you are spending only time and energy in a negotiation, you have a budget of 1x × 2x, for a total budget of 2x. If you start throwing real money around, your budget is 2x × 3x, or 6x. The real budget has tripled over the budget for time-and-energy alone. What happens if your emotions enter the negotiation and the equation in a powerful way? Multiply that 6x by 4x. You’re up to 24x, a large relative number that serves mainly to demonstrate how important the budget for emotion is, how dangerous emotional investment is.

Budget Formula

The formula for calculating your job search budget is:

Budget = 1 x Time + 2 x Energy + 3 x Money + 4 x Emotion

Notice that time is the smallest piece of the budget and emotion is the largest. Most of us would instinctively say it was the opposite.

Time

Time is a crucial piece of any job search budget. I currently have two clients who are swamped at work. Even though they are miserable in their jobs, they have not carved out time to make their job search a priority.

When you are unemployed, time is available. When you are employed, you need to create time to dedicate to finding your next job. You need to create a budget where you dedicate a few hours per week to your job search.

The days of working for the same company for many years are over. It helps to look at yourself as an independent contractor where you are always looking for that next job. You absolutely need to budget time for this effort.

Energy

If you feel low, tired, or sapped, you will not make a good impression when you meet someone in networking or an interview. Managing your energy is critical. This might mean being picky in the networking events you choose to attend, or meeting people during the time of day when you are at your best.

I am a morning person. I attend a breakfast meeting every Wednesday morning at 7 AM. This is not for everyone. What is the best time of day for you to meet people?

Are you exercising? I recently had a client climb stairs before hopping on a phone interview. He felt tired, but getting some mildly aerobic exercise before the interview perked him up. This contributed to him getting to the next round of interviews.

Money

Ah money…yes, you will need to add money to your budget. Here is a list of things you might consider when adding to your budget:

  • Personal website – I will be doing a blog post next month on a new website branded.me
  • Resume and LinkedIn profile assistance – You may want to get one or both spiffed up
  • Career Coach – You might want to spend time with someone like myself to help you
  • Lunch, coffee, or networking – Allocate a certain weekly amount to spend on these
  • Transportation – This might be gas or airfare.

Emotions

How much are you willing to invest emotionally in your job search? We all know the emotional letdown when we are:

  • Not selected to get an interview
  • Passed over in the next round of interviews
  • Declined a job offer

Each time you pursue a company or position, there is a high probability you will not be selected. Remember: this is like dating and marriage; you will date a lot of people before you decide to get married. Just like in dating, it is emotionally draining when we are rejected.

Camp says:

The thrill of victory! The agony of defeat! I’ll bet you recognize those words almost immediately, because they have become clichés in our culture, thanks to ABC’s Wide World of Sports. I still remember the ski jumper whose goggles fly off as he crashes over the side of the ski jump and the American hockey team celebrating their unbelievable victory over the Soviet squad, back in 1980 when the United States and the USSR were bitter adversaries. And when it comes to my son’s college football games, I know all about thrill and agony. For sports fans, these extreme emotions are fine. They’re mandatory for the fun. For negotiators, they’re dangerous.

 Do not underestimate the need to manage your emotional budget.

Hiring Manager’s Budget

Everything I have written about in this post also applies to the hiring manager. They have a budget:

  • How much time are they willing to put into the hiring process? Are they in a hurry, or can they wait?
  • How much energy are they expending to make the hire happen?
  • How much money are they willing to spend? Are they willing to fly you out for an interview?
  • How emotionally involved are they with you? When a candidate turns down an offer, it is emotionally draining for the hiring team, as well.

You need to create—and control—your budget. You need to know their budget.

If you do both success will follow.

Have you created a budget for your job search?

This is the 8th post in the Negotiator Job Search series.

Here is the rest of the series so far:

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for July 18

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Baby Boomers

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

Assume Nothing – The Negotiator Job Search

Assume Nothing

assumeIn negotiations like your job search, you should assume nothing.

This is the 7th post in the Negotiator Job Search series.

Here is the rest of the series so far:

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

Now what about assumptions, the other chief obstacle to effective blank slating? They’re just as dangerous as positive and negative expectations, and just as common, because most of us come to believe that we’re pretty good at reading other people, at understanding what they’re really feeling and thinking. Negotiators, in particular, tend to pride themselves on their people skills. A thousand times I’ve heard someone say:

“I know what they’ll do if we make that offer.”

“This is the way they operate.”

“If you raise the price, they’ll want a volume discount.”

“I’m pretty sure she makes the decisions over there.”

“There’s no way they’ll make an offer today.”

You have probably had similar thoughts as it relates to your job search.

“When they make me an offer, it will be take or leave it.”

” If I make a counter offer, they will walk away.”

“If I don’t immediately accept the offer, they will walk away.”

 These kinds of assumptions can get you into trouble. Remember to assume nothing.

Practical Examples

When I headed off to teach high school math, I assumed that high schools would want me. I was an engineer with significant training and experience. I had taught for over 20 years in close to 40 different countries. There was a shortage of math teachers. Of course they would want me!

Boy, was I wrong! Schools want highly compliant people. I was a male and over 40 years of age. A demographic that is not typically considered to be compliant. It was very difficult to even get interviews.

I had a client who was offered a position in the headquarters of a major retailer. He assumed that vacation and health insurance would be included. Before he signed anything, I insisted he go through the offer carefully. Two items popped out:

  • Company health insurance did not start until being employed for six months
  • Paid Time Off (PTO) was not accrued until six months of employment

It would have been easy to assume that both of these benefits were not negotiable. That would been a bad assumption.

For more:  (Assumptions – How They Create Career Sinkholes)

Research

You need to do your research. Through our research, we found an HR professional who had left the company. She informed us that the company had a policy that, if asked, they would pay the employee’s COBRA payment until the company health insurance was available. Also, the company would fill the PTO account with a negotiated amount of days on the first day of employment.

Research is key.

You will need to reach out to current and former employees of the business. Ask them about the hiring process. Ask them what they wish they knew before they were hired.

Carefully research the company on the Internet including websites like Glassdoor.com.

For more: (How to check out a company before….)

Remember to assume nothing in the job search process.
Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Emotions and the Job Search – Creating a Blank Slate

Emotions and the Job Search

emotionsManaging your emotions is as key in the job search as it is in negotiations. It is important to become a blank slate!

This is the 6th post in the Negotiator Job Search series.

Here is the rest of the series so far:

 Blank Slate

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

In my system, “blank slate” is a verb. As negotiators, we actively blank slate in order to create a blank slate in our own minds, which then sits ready and waiting to receive any new information, new attitudes, new emotions, or new anything that our adversary wittingly or unwittingly beams our way. It is through blank slating that we learn what’s really going on in this negotiation— what’s really holding things up, what the adversary really needs.

Maintaining a blank slate or keeping your emotions in check is key in the job search.

Managing Positive Emotions

During a recent interview, a client of mine was told, “We needed you in this job yesterday!”

It would have been easy for her to think she basically had this job! She could have let down her guard and not listened with the same level of attention. She could have stopped asking probing questions. Instead, she said thank you and moved on to the next question.

You have to remember to not get caught up in your positive euphoria. You need to stay focused and not let your positive emotions get you to lose sight of the goal. Remember your Mission and Purpose of the job search.

Managing Negative Emotions

Many of you have encountered a situation wherein the recruiter calls you and starts to discuss money very early on. They throw out a low ball number, and you think:

Oh crap! I can’t work for that amount of money. What the heck should I do now?

It would be easy to lose your excitement for the position.

In late 2007, I was called by a recruiter from a sexy startup. They had a newly created training position, and wanted to know if I was interested. We got into a discussion of compensation, and I asked her what she had budgeted for the position. She gave me a really low number.

At this point, I could have easily said I was not interested. Instead, I responded that they will not get anyone with any real experience at that price. They really needed someone with a fair amount of experience for this position. She asked me about my current salary.

My current salary was not relevant because I was working for a non-profit.

I gave her an approximate number of what I made when I left high tech sector four years earlier (which was double what she had budgeted!).

She asked me if I was still interested.

I told her we should keep talking.

I could have easily become negative, and it would have come out in our conversation. Instead, I maintained a blank slate. They eventually made me an offer that was close to my previous compensation.

Have you been able to maintain a blank slate and control your emotions.

Can you tell us about your experiences?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for July 11

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Baby Boomers

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

Art of Questions – Nurturing and Reversing

Art of Questions – Nurturing and ReversingArt_of_Questions

The art of questions is the next phase in the Negotiator Job Search.

This is the 5th post in the Negotiator Job Search series.

Here is the rest of the series so far:

Nurturing

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

Art of QuestionsYour ability to nurture will be the key to bringing the negotiation back to the table after a breakdown. Your ability to nurture your adversary, to put him or her at ease, is the key to assuring her that you are listening and that you value what she has to say. Nurturing is also just another way to allow your adversary to feel okay.

Nurturing should be part of your body language. When you’re seated, refrain from a sudden forward movement. Lean back. Relax your neck, face, and hands. If you’re standing, lean against the wall, lower your posture. No one is going to deal effectively with you if you’re towering over them. This is common sense, and even an average negotiator would pretty much adhere to this principle. 

When in doubt, slow your cadence of speech, lower your voice. As the old saying goes, laughter often is the best medicine, especially laughter directed at ourselves. Laughter is a way to nurture everyone in the room— including ourselves.

Your goal is to put the interviewer and yourself at ease. How you use your tone of voice is key. No need to get touchy-feely, but if you see an opportunity, ask your interviewer, “What is your budget for this position?” If you use a non-confrontational tone and fairly casual manner, you’ll be surprised how the interviewer will respond.

How you say things matters! It is an important part in the art of questions.

Reversing

reversingCamp writes:

This is a behavior that you must hone to perfection for successful negotiations. The reverse is the behavioral tactic that answers a question with a question, the answer to which will do you some good. When your adversary asks you a question, you do have to say something, but not in the way in which you were trained in school.

“How are you?”

“Great. How are you?”

It is highly likely that you will be asked a couple of questions that you will not want to answer.

This is where the art of questions is really needed. Let’s look at how to answer the following question:

What is your current salary?

I have written about this topic before in my post What is Your Current Salary? How to Answer!

You will need to use your nurturing voice and answer with a question. Here is an example:

I presume you are asking about my current salary because you want to know if I am a good fit for your budget. What is your budget for this position?

You need to practice this ahead of time. You will want to use a low key, nurturing tone of voice. It is important that you are casual in your delivery of the question.

Another question you will not want to directly answer is the following:

Why do you want to leave your current job?

You absolutely do not want to go negative. They will think “next” if you respond about how your current boss is a jerk.

You should phrase your response as follows:

My current position is okay, but what I am looking for is a position that can give me…

You will find multiple examples of how to reverse this question in the post Why Do You Want to Leave Your Current Position.

There is an art to this. It will take practice to use your nurturing voice and reverse the question. You can do this!!

Have you ever reversed one of these questions?

It is all part of the art of questions!

The next post in the series is called Quiet Your Mind, Create a Blank Slate.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for July 4

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Baby Boomers

Social Media

Career

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work

Questions That Power The Negotiator Job Search

Questions

questionsQuestions power the entire negotiation and job search process.

The goal is to ask questions that will probe for pain points. We want the interviewer to spill the beans!

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

We use the specific goals of behavior and action—goals we can control—that I call the “fuels of the system.” These are the behavioral habits that allow us to peel the onion of the adversary’s business situation and negotiating position and find out what’s really going on over there. The single most important fuel that you have, the most important behavioral goal and habit you can develop, is your ability to ask questions.

Your goal is to ask questions to find out why they are hiring, what problems they want to solve, what is the budget, when do they want to hire, how is the organization structured, etc.

You need to ask questions from the hiring manager’s perspective. You want to get into his or her head!

The Power of Correct Questions

Camp writes:

Asking questions is a science and an art. The science is in how you intellectually construct a question. The art is found in how you ask it: your tone of voice, your creative choice of words, your behavior and remarks before asking your question.

We will start with the science. Questions can start with a verb or an interrogative (who, what, where, who…).

Examples of questions that start with a verb:

  • Will you be hiring soon?
  • Do you have a budget for this position?
  • Is this a new position?

There are only three answers to these questions. Yes, no or maybe.

These kinds of questions do not get you the information you want!

Interrogative based questions are open ended. Your goal is to develop a clear picture of what is going on in the organization so that you can best position yourself.

Let’s take a look at these kinds of questions:

  • Why is this position open?
  • What is the budget for this position?
  • What problem are you trying to solve by filling this position?
  • Who has the final decision on who you will be hiring?
  • When do you plan to fill this position?
  • How will you determine the final candidate?

All of these questions can be used in the initial phone screen.

When you interview in person, you can ask:

  • What are the main business issues you are facing?
  • Where do you see this position going?
  • What keeps you up at night?
  • What is the hiring manager’s management style?
  • How does the team interact?
  • How often does the team get together?

All of these questions cannot be answered with a yes, no, or maybe.

The key is to keep these questions short and ask only one question at a time.  Remember K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid).

Never, ever revert to asking questions that start with a verb. It is very easy to fall into. You will need to practice this with an interview partner.

Next Steps

Develop a set of interrogative based or open ended questions. Use the same set of questions in every interview. Compare the answers after each interview. Are you getting conflicting answers?

The next post, called Nurturing and Reversing – The Negotiator Job Search, will discuss the art of asking questions.

Do you have a standard set of questions that you use in every interview?

Are they open ended questions?

This is the 4th post in the Negotiator Job Search series.

Here is the rest of the series so far:

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Stop Trying to Control the Outcome – The Negotiator Job Search

Control the Outcome

controlRemember—you are not in control when you are in a job search!

You do not control:

  • When companies create new positions
  • When positions open up due to a person leaving
  • How fast a company proceeds in the hiring process
  • Whether a recruiter or hiring manager gives you feedback

You are not in control!

The purpose of this post is to discuss what you can control.

This is the 3rd in the Negotiator Job Search series.

Here is the rest of the series so far:

In Jim Camp’s book, Start with NO…The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know, he writes:

Just as with mission and purpose, I believe in these tools but call for a different approach from the usual one. My clients do not set sales targets, quotas, numbers, percentages. Never. Instead, they set goals they can control.

What Can We Control?

Think about the above question. Most of you will come to the conclusion that the answer is “ourselves.” That is only partially true.

What can we control?

Again Camp writes:

Can we manage our heart rate, for example? I’ve read that certain monks of a high caliber can do so, but most of us cannot. Can we control our anger following an insult? Not really, not the emotion itself. Time? Can we control time? Well, we can’t alter the fact that there are only twenty-four hours in a day to work with, and some of these will be “lost” to sleep, but we can control what we do during waking hours and how we do it. By this progression we arrive at the real answer to what we can control about ourselves: behavior and activity, or as I sometimes put it, an action or effort to an end.

The only thing we can control is our own behavior and activity!

Common Actions You Can Control

I wrote in a recent post titled Waiting is not a Job Search Strategy to:

  • Create a target list of companies that are capable of hiring you
  • Reach out to hiring managers and recruiters and tell them of your value proposition
  • Ask for contact information of the interviewer at the beginning of every phone or in-person interview
  • Follow up and follow up and follow up after every step of the process.

What other things can you control:

Letting Go of What We Cannot Control

During a period in the 1990s, I was traveling once or twice a month on business. There was a period that lasted more than two years during which something went wrong on every trip. For example: weather, equipment failures, heart attack of a passenger on the plane that diverted the flight, a jet bridge collapsing, and many more. What I learned was that I was not in control.

One morning, I was flying to Atlanta to talk to a Linux users group in the evening. I was a geek who could speak! The sales team wanted me to speak to a major customer in the early afternoon while I was there. I arrived in Dallas from Austin and it was obvious that I would not get to Atlanta in time to speak to this customer.

Previously, I would have worried about being late. I would have worried about disappointing the sales team. Instead, I called my contact from the airport and left him a message that I was not going to get there in time. The weather in Atlanta would not cooperate. There was no way to get there in time.

I did not control the weather in Atlanta!

Focus on what you can control in your job search!

What are you going to let go of controlling?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group