Passion for Career or Hobbies or No Passion at All

Passion for Career or Hobbies or No Passion at All

PassionPassion is a term that is thrown around a lot these days:

  • Some of you have passion for your career
  • Some of you have a passion for the arts, literature or music which is fulfilled outside of work
  • Some are searching for passion and cannot seem to find it

When I wrote the post What If You Are Not Passionate About Anything? back in 2012, I did not know it would be one of the most found posts on the Career Pivot blog. It is found through Google Search hundreds of times each month.

Passion for your Career

When I left home, I was not expected to follow my passion. I was expected to get an education and then get a good paying job. Did I know what I was passionate about when I was 18—or even 21—years of age?

Heck no!

It took me many years to get out of the box and start to explore my passions. For me, it was a near fatal bicycle accident shook me to the core.

I know I am not all that unusual. A lot of my clients are searching for their passion, too.

Passion for the Arts, Music, or Literature

Over the last three years, I have met many who had a passion for the arts, music, or literature. Many of them dropped those passions because they could not make enough money and have success by pursuing them as a career.

Some dropped them completely and, in the process, made themselves miserable. Others pursued their passions as a hobby—singing or playing in church, drawing, or reading all of the time.

I have helped a few clients reignite their passion by encouraging them to just do it. I wrote about Susan in The Arts and Your Career. Susan had been a photographer early in her working career, but eventually gave it up. Since then, she has taken it up again and now it feeds her soul.

No Passion at All

I wrote the post What If You Are Not Passionate About Anything? based on my Birkman assessment. I have a lot of varied interests and I switch jobs frequently. I have no one single passion that drives me and my career. It is a combination of interests that drives me.

I have discovered 10-20% of the population are just like me. Society tells us that we should have a single driving passion. Well, that is just not true for some of us.

As many of us approach retirement age, a new concept has arisen—an encore career! A new opportunity to pursue our passion.

Where do you fall in this continuum of passion?

Are you interested in figuring out your passion and make a pivot to a new encore career?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for May 23

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

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Baby Boomer

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Top 5 Unspoken Objections To Hiring A Baby Boomer

Top 5 Unspoken Objections To Hiring A Baby Boomer

objectionsThere are certain universal unspoken objections that exist when considering whether or not to hire a Baby Boomer. You need to know what they are so that you can deal with them without them manifesting into an insurmountable problem.

Self-talk, at times, can be a wonderful thing. It can persuade us all to be more positive, it can lead us to achieve greater things, to step outside of our comfort zone and to do things we did not think were humanly possible.

Self-talk is not only a power for good, however.

Negative self-talk is built into the fabric of each and every one of us. We make negative assumptions about the world around us in every way imaginable. We talk ourselves out of great things. We look for ways to discredit. We find faults in everything. We do this every single day of our lives. Anyone who tries to convince you otherwise is a liar! It is an inevitability that negative self-talk will happen in the mind of every recruiter or employer when considering whether or not to hire a Baby Boomer. To make matters more complicated they exist only in the minds of the recruiters or potential employers. They will NEVER admit to them or say them out loud.

These are the top 5 unspoken objections to hiring a Baby Boomer:

UNSPOKEN OBJECTIONS #1 – You are Tech-Averse

Amazingly, 28% of the US workforce are technology averse.

These people are the 16% who have a cell phone but have not yet graduated to owning a smartphone. These people are the 20% who do not have wireless internet in their homes. These people have little or no social media presence whatsoever. You know who you are!

Being tech-averse is something that immediately makes you stand out from the rest of the workforce for all the wrong reasons, especially if that tech-aversion extends to you having a fear of all things social media related. The way that recruiters and employers directly source for candidates has changed forever. The first thing a recruiter does in the morning when they get to work is open their email, their database and their LinkedIn page. It is now embedded into almost every sourcing model. Having a LinkedIn profile is a must, regardless of your age. If you do not have a LinkedIn profile, you need to get one NOW!

More: Can Disruptive Technologies Disrupt Your Career?

UNSPOKEN OBJECTIONS #2 – You won’t get along with younger members of the team

Lack of culture fit.

If I had $1 for every time I have heard this as a reason for not hiring an older applicant, I would be rich!

Older people tend to have more in common with older people, that much is obvious. That said, that does not stop older people from working well in multi generational teams (something that employers are beginning to see the benefit of more and more). A great way to convince an interviewer that you will work well with younger team members is to give them an example of a time when you formed a friendship with somebody much younger than you and how you built a great working relationship with them. If you can really make the point that you can give them all of your wonderful experience whilst at the same time engaging and communicating with rest of the team, that will really help to put the interviewers mind at ease.

More: Gen Y Boss – Baby Boomer, are you ready?

UNSPOKEN OBJECTIONS #3 – You are stuck in your ways

A common misconception is that the Baby Boomer generation are set in their ways and not open to learning new things.

In my experience, interviewers automatically jump on the ‘you can’t teach an old dog new tricks’ bandwagon when considering Baby Boomer candidates. To combat this, offer up some examples of what you have recently learned something new. This doesn’t have to be work related. Try and demonstrate that you have not reached an intellectual plateau and that you can easily pick up new things quickly.

More: Talents versus Skills – Do you know the difference?

UNSPOKEN OBJECTIONS #4 – You are too expensive

Inevitably, the most experienced workers in the workforce are often the most expensive.

Remember that you are competing with other candidates who will be a LOT less expensive than you in terms of salary. The best thing you can do to handle this, in my experience, is to state your openness and flexibility (to an extent!) when it comes to your salary requirements. I have lost count of the amount of time I have seen Baby Boomers lose out on a job simply because they were unwilling to lower their salary requirements.

More: What is Your Current Salary? How to Answer!

UNSPOKEN OBJECTIONS #5 – You are too negative

Now this may (or may not) come as a shock to you, however, there are a huge amount of Baby Boomers out there who have a very negative outlook when it comes to life in general!

This can be a huge red flag for any interviewer. It is your negativity that stopped you getting the job, not your age. Try and be as upbeat as you can and avoid telling negative stories at interview. Smile and try and steer your answers in a positive direction! Also, reiterate your openness to trying new ways of working. This in itself can have leave a hugely positive impression in the minds of the interviewer.

The only way to deal with these unspoken objections is head on!

You need to get them into the conversation somehow, whether that is face to face in an interview or simply over the phone. Tick them off in your mind one by one as you go along. If you manage this, you will have done as much as is humanly possible to erase the negative self-talk that exists in the mind of the interviewer and will improve your chances of landing the job exponentially!

Have you heard any of these unspoken objections in your career?

Chris MorrowChris Morrow has spent the past decade working in the recruitment industry in both the UK and Australia. He is a Candidate Coach & Founder of chrismorrow.careers a website dedicated to helping job seekers improve their chances of success when looking for a new job

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Waiting is not a Job Search Strategy

Waiting is not a strategy

waitingMost of you are waiting on:

  • A job to be posted
  • A response from a recruiter after submitting your resume to a job posting
  • A response from a recruiter after a phone screen
  • A response from the recruiter or hiring manager after an interview

You do not want to be a pest. You do not want to seem to forward.

Well…be a pest. Be aggressive! Pursue what you want.

Most importantly…STOP WAITING!

Waiting for a position to be posted

Approximately 80 percent of positions are never posted. So why are you waiting?

Use the Targeted Job Search approach by targeting companies and quit chasing “the job.”

Build a list of companies who are capable of hiring you. Use LinkedIn advanced search to find companies that hire people with skills like yours. Approach potential peers and hiring managers, telling them about the problems you solve.

Stop waiting for a position to be posted!

Waiting to hear from someone after submitting your resume

If you do see a position posted, then immediately seek out a contact from within the company. A huge percentage of positions are filled through referrals. Find a referral first!

If you do submit your resume for a position, very aggressively reach out to recruiters or HR professionals in the company to find out who is hiring for the position. Do not wait for someone to contact you.

The strategy of my fellow Launch Pad Job Club board member, Jim Adcock, was to reach out to recruiters and ask, “I wanted to make sure you received my resume. The sexual nature of my last name sometimes causes my resume to get caught is SPAM filters.” Yes, this worked!

Waiting for a response after a phone screen with a recruiter

It is very common for recruiters to be have up to 60 positions to fill at any one time. Call the recruiter 24 hours after the initial phone screen. Be courteous but persistent. You want to stay on the top of their mind.

The important point here is to call them. Leave them a voicemail if they do not answer.

If you do not hear back, call them again in a day or so. Do not wait a week to call them back. Be persistent.

Waiting for a response after an in person interview

Make sure an get business cards and contact information from everyone you interview with. Ask for their business cards at the beginning of every interview. If they decide you are not the right candidate during the interview, they may not offer you their business card at the end.

Similar to waiting for a response after a phone screen, you want to follow up quickly and be persistent.

If you do not hear from them after several weeks, use the Take Away Closing Technique. Call the hiring manager and leave them the following message:

I am presuming that you are no longer interested in me for the xyz position. If you have not found your ideal candidate, I would be happy to recommend someone else for the position. Let me know if I can be of any help to you in filling this position.

If the hiring manager is still interested in you, they will reach out to you quickly. Earlier in my career, if I wanted someone to call me back, I would leave the following message:

Hey Larry, could you call me back about the planned gold shipment.

Larry would usually call me back because he wanted to know about this supposed gold shipment…which was fictitious.

Be persistent and quit waiting

The idea for this blog post came from a presentation by Gary O’Neal, who presented at Launch Pad Job Club.

Gary made it very clear that recruiters and hiring managers would like to respond to every applicant. The reality is that they have way too much on their plate. On average, there are 180 applicants for every job posted.

If you want to get hired, you need to quit waiting and be persistent.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for May 16

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Social Media

Career

Baby Boomer

Job Search

Career Pivot

 

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Baby Boomer Brain Drain – Does Anyone Care? [Infographic]

Baby Boomer Brain Drain

brain drainNextAvenue.org published America’s Coming Brain Drain: Retiring Boomers which contains an infographic from MBA@UNC. This infographic, seen below, chronicles the issues that will be caused by baby boomers leaving the work force—the Baby Boomer Brain Drain.

What I find disturbing is that so few companies are preparing or seem to care at all.

Baby Boomers in the Workforce

Let me spell out some key statistics:

  • Baby boomers have 56% of corporate leadership positions
  • 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day and will continue to for almost 20 years
  • In 2029, all baby boomers will be 65 years old or older
  • Baby boomers account for 31% of the workforce
  • 4 million companies, which make up 66% of all businesses with employees, are owned by baby boomers

Baby boomers will leave the workforce in the next 20 years, but not in the way we planned.

Are Companies Planning for the Baby Boomer Brain Drain?

Heck NO!

  • 62% of employers at Fortune 1000 companies believe that future retirements will result in skilled labor shortages in the next 5 years
  • 68% of employers have not analyzed the demographics of their workforce
  • 77% of employers have not analyzed the retirement rates of current employees
  • Only 19-37% of employers have taken action to prevent baby boomer brain drain

Baby Boomers and Retirement

Many of us do not want to retire like our parents. Many of us want to learn new skills and stay current and active. Many of us cannot do this alone.

Returning to college is cost prohibitive. I wrote about this in my post College Degree After 50 – Worth It?

Companies will need us to stay on the job, but are they doing anything about it? The statistics below say NO!

Brought to you by MBA@UNC’s online MBA programs

What do you think? What should companies and/or the government do?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for May 9

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

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Social Media

  • The Secrets of a Successful LinkedIn Blog – by People Who Really Know with Marc Miller  http://bit.ly/1EVbcC5
  • GOA I was on last week –> The Secrets of a Successful LinkedIn Blog – by People Who Really Know http://bit.ly/1L0Lk9Y

Career

Multi-Generational Workplace

Baby Boomer

Job Search

Career Pivot

 

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Should I Take the Buyout Package

Buyout Package

buyout packageHave you or someone you know been offered a buyout package?

If you work for a large multinational corporation or the US federal government, the answer is probably yes.

How do you determine whether to take it or not?

The idea for this post came from a New York Times article, Making Money Decisions When You Lose Your Job.

I have also had multiple clients who were offered a buyout package or severance. You will find references to them in my post, 4 Signs That You Are Working for a Failing Company.  Rather interesting—I reposted that same material on LinkedIn Pulse and it went viral. Check out the comments.

I then recorded a podcast with Roger Whitney, the Retirement Answer Man, on this topic.

Evaluating the Buyout Package

You need to consider the following:

  • Immediate financial needs
  • Tax implications
  • Health insurance
  • Provisions of the separation, including non-compete clauses
  • Long term financial needs
  • Mental health and well-being

Immediate Financial Needs of the Buyout Package

How are you going to make ends meet financially?

  • Check out unemployment benefits
  • Consult your financial adviser immediately
  • Perform a careful budget analysis. How much money do you actually need to live?

If you plan to return to work, a good rule of thumb is to allow one month of unemployment for every $10,000 of annual income. If you are making $100,000 annually, you can expect your job search to take 10 months.

For a deep perspective on this topic read my post How Long Will My Job Search Take?

Tax Implications

If you get a lump sum severance in the second half of the year AND you get 6 months or more of severance, you may move into a higher tax bracket…especially if you find work quickly.

I had one client get contract work within 6 weeks of being laid off. This was in the September/October time frame. He told his new employer to withhold pay until the following year. This helped him in two ways:

  1. He did not need the money now, and the extra money would’ve pushed him into a higher tax bracket
  2. He would receive a lump sum check in January, which was an emotional relief

If it is late in the year, you may be able to negotiate to delay receiving your severance until the following year. Larger multinational companies may not do this, but smaller companies will likely negotiate.

Consult your tax accountant.

Health Insurance

This is less of a big deal than in the past. Now, you can buy individual health insurance due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). You will get sticker shock!

Group health insurance via your employer is EXPENSIVE! You paid for it indirectly via lower wages and your employer purchased it. Check last years W-2 statement. It clearly states what your employer spent on your health insurance. When you continue your company health insurance via COBRA, it will be pricey.

Consult with an insurance broker who can spell out your options. You will have many of them, but, since you will be paying for your health insurance at least for a while, it’s worth it to go through them all.

Provisions of the Separation, Including Non-Compete Clauses

Read through the separation agreement. I suggest you take it to your lawyer.

If you have a non-compete clause in your contract and you live in a right to work state like Texas, that non-compete is likely not enforceable. Contact an employment lawyer.

Long term financial needs

Review your retirement accounts with your financial adviser. When I left my last company, I was completely stressed out. My blood pressure was very high and I was becoming physically ill from working there. I had to get out.

I went to my financial adviser and asked, “Can I retire? Can I retire now?

After running numerous Monte Carlo simulations, the answer was yes. I had no plans to retire and I had already started Career Pivot legally, but it gave me piece of mind to know that I would be okay.

I have had multiple clients who have been offered both voluntary and involuntary packages. I always tell them to talk to their financial advisers.

Mental Health and Well-Being

Your mental health and well-being is critical in evaluating a buyout package. One of the key factors to consider is that you will likely not have a paycheck. No matter how well prepared you are, emotionally giving up the paycheck is really difficult.

When I gave up the paycheck, I still woke up at 4 in the morning in a cold sweat saying to myself,

“I do not have a paycheck!!”

Do not under estimate the emotions that will surface. Find someone—a spouse, friend, counselor, clergy, social worker, etc.—to help you work through these emotions.

For a deep perspective on this topic read my post Demise of the Paycheck – Good Riddance.

When a buyout package is offered, evaluate it using expert advice. You may be tempted to wait for the next round.

When a buyout package is offered, the next round is almost never more lucrative.

Have you been offered a buyout package? Tell us about your experiences!
Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

The Best and Worst Parts of Working from Home

Working from Home

working from homeWhen you’re stuck in the throes of commuting and cubicle life, working from home can seem like the light at the end of the tunnel. And for the most part, it is. But there are aspects of telecommuting that can be taxing, particularly if you’ve never done it before. Here are just some of the best and worst parts of working from home—and how to handle them.

The benefits of working from home:

Your schedule is your own.

Doctor’s appointments. Your child’s writing celebration. Gym time. There are so many demands on your day that it’s hard to fit them all in, especially when you work in an office. Having a flexible schedule means you can adjust your schedule to meet the challenges of your day—and still get all of your work done. It might mean starting your workday earlier or finishing up later, but having complete control over your schedule is truly the ultimate in work-life balance.

No interruptions.
When you worked in an office, you had a steady stream of chatty colleagues stopping by your ‘cube to talk…and talk…and talk. Phones were ringing and machines were beeping. Sitting in your home office, though, you can savor the silence—and zero interruptions. Being able to work in a more focused manner without incessant interruptions is definitely a bonus of working remotely.

Increased productivity.
Studies have shown time and time again that remote workers are far more productive than their in-office peers. Why? Without having a lengthy commute, a micromanaging boss breathing down your neck, and typical office interruptions, telecommuters can experience greater productivity without anything to interrupt their workflow.

The downside of working from home:

It can be lonely.
When you first started to work from home, you couldn’t believe how absolutely quiet it was. You could hear the slight hum of your computer being on. In fact, you could hear yourself think! At first, that was a huge benefit. But after awhile, working from home can get a bit lonely, even for those former office workers who were once desperate to ditch their office mates. One way to combat this is to stay in touch socially with your virtual colleagues, either by instant message, email, phone, or even sites like Yammer or Sococo, which can give you the virtual feeling of working together as a team. Another option is to take your office on the road with you, working at a local Starbucks, the park, or even a co-working space where you’ll be around people but still be able to get your work done, too.

You have to be very disciplined.
Sure, you have a project due by the end of the day…but there’s a Walking Dead marathon on that you want to watch. While there are a lot of distractions when you work in an office, there might be even more when you work from home (your comfy bed, anyone?). So it’s important to treat working from home as if you were working in an actual office. Set up your home office away from other distractions, such as the TV or the kitchen. Even though you have flexibility as to when and how you work, you still need to take your remote job seriously and treat it as such.

You must be able to problem-solve.
You can’t connect to your company’s videoconference. Your landline connection is spotty. A myriad of tech issues can happen when you’re a telecommuter. Whereas you could always reach out to the IT department when your computer glitched on you, now that you’re working from home, you are the IT department. Being a telecommuter means that you’ll need to be able to problem-solve fast—and also on your own.

But fixing issues isn’t always just of the tech kind; you might get what reads like a testy email from a coworker. Or you might get a confusing IM from your boss. Instead of letting issues slide (and then having to deal with the emotional aftermath later), it’s up to you to exhibit your superior communication skills to handle anything that comes your way. That way, you can clear the air and continue working peacefully (and productively) from home.

Just like anything else, working from home has its pluses and minuses. But if you go into it knowing what to expect—and knowing some traits about yourself, too—you’ll be able to thrive as a remote worker and find the Holy Grail that is work-life balance.

Jennifer ParrisThis post was written by Jennifer Parris, career writer at FlexJobs, the award-winning site for telecommuting and flexible job listings. FlexJobs lists thousands of pre-screened, legitimate, and professional-level work-from-home jobs and other types of flexibility like part-time positions, freelancing, and flexible schedules. Jennifer provides career and job search advice through the FlexJobs Blog and social media. Learn more at www.FlexJobs.com.

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BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for May 2

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Social Media

Career

Baby Boomer

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper The Multi-Generational Workplace – Making Generational Diversity Work