BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for June 14

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Social Media

Baby Boomer

Career

Networking

Job Search

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Case Study – Targeted Job Search

Case Study – A Real Life Example of a Targeted Job Search

case studyI met my client, who I will call Susan, 18 months ago—and this was the start of her targeted job search.

Susan is a project manager and marketing professional. She worked for a small firm where the founding partners were in disagreement on the direction of the company. It looked like the company would be sold or close its doors.

Susan is unmarried and is very worried about her retirement. She is like many women in her position—worried about becoming a bag lady.

She decided to target institutions that could provide a pension, which meant universities and government institutions.

I explained to her the aspects of a targeted job search that she needed to understand:

  • Her next position would come through a relationship
  • She has absolutely no control over the timing

Step #1 – Building her target list

Susan decided to target a very large university in the area. This university had a lot of colleges that were fairly autonomous in their hiring. She targeted the colleges and departments that most attracted her.

Step #2 – Started to strategically networking

Susan created a list of everyone she knew at the university and started to reach out to those people. She regularly scheduled coffee or lunch meetings with her contacts and she followed my strategy of “Asking for AIR” (Advice, Insights and Recommendations).

Step #3 – Leveraging Employee Referrals

Employee referrals are golden. Each time she heard about a position opening up or found one listed on the university job board, she customized her resume and had someone in her network pass it along to the hiring manager before applying on-line.

Susan got a some interviews and was a finalist a few times, but wasn’t offered a position. This continued for over a year. She was getting very discouraged. The situation at her current job had not gotten any better.

About a month ago, she got an e-mail from someone in her network. A position was available that was a really good fit for her. The problem was that they were already interviewing candidates. She needed to move fast! Susan’s contact passed her customized resume in to HR. Within a couple of days, the university called her to schedule an interview.

Susan was not immediately available to interview. The hiring manager was extremely patient and waited to interview her.

What was going on?

It turned out that Susan had applied for a similar position earlier in the year. The person they hired did not work out and was let go. When her resume was submitted to the hiring committee, someone immediately recognized her name from the previous application and fast tracked the resume to the right people.

A couple of rigorous interviews later, she had an offer letter.

What had Susan done right?

Susan did a lot of things right over the past year:

  • She diligently and consistently worked her network.
  • She attended regular meetups on digital marketing and was a regular at PMI meetings. She was up on the latest advances and, more importantly, she knew the lingo!
  • She focused much of the last year on her health. She felt good and it showed!

Susan was even able to negotiate a salary at the university that was very close to her current salary. She was moving from the private to public sector. She knew she would take a pay cut, but it ended up being minimal.

The new position came through a relationship. The timing was a complete surprise.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

BoomerJobTips – Curated Content for May 17

BoomerJobTips Update

BoomerJobTipsWelcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Job Search

Workplace

Career

Baby Boomer

Career Pivot

 

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

7 Key Characteristics to Job Satisfaction or Dissatisfaction

jobDo you love or hate your job?

Do you know why you feel the way you do? What about your current job, makes you happy or makes you want to pull your hair out?

Let’s discuss 7 key characteristics of your current job.

1. Boss

The number one reason people leave their jobs is the boss.

Do you like your current boss? If so, what is it that makes them a good boss? If your current boss is a pain, what is it that they do that annoys you?

Think back to when you had an ideal boss. What were their characteristics?

2. Rewards

Do you feel valued at work? What do they do to make you feel valued?

Most of us want some combination of the following:

  • Fulfilling Mission
  • Public Recognition
  • Financial reward
  • Pat on the back from the boss
  • Pat on the back from your team
  • Pat on the back from your client

Most of us want a combination of two or three of these. What is it that you want?

3. Team

Do you enjoy your current team? If so, what are the characteristics of the group? How would you describe a team that you have really enjoyed?

4. Variety

Do you like to juggle? Do you enjoy a varied schedule? You may be like me who enjoys doing one thing at a time and does not like to be interrupted.

How much variety do you need?

5. Structure and rules

Do you like when there are clearly defined ways to do things? If so, who created the structure? On the other hand do you enjoy ambiguity? Do you like to make things up as you go?

What happens when your boss comes into your office with a detailed list of how to do things and expects you to execute it in exactly that manner?

6. Activity

How much activity do you need in your day? If you are like me, I cannot sit behind a desk for more than 45 minutes at a time.

When I made a mid-career pivot to teach high school math in an inner city school, I was fine being on my feet all day. On the contrary, I had members of my certification cohort who were dying from being on their feet all day! My activity level was different than theirs.

7. Emotions

Do you need an emotionally supportive environment? I have had a couple of male clients respond with “huh?” Yes, many of us guys are pretty low empathy and do not want a very emotional environment.

What about you? Do you like to be able to express your feelings at work?

I have a client who is a former flight attendant. She talks about the high emotional component in the “back of the plane.”  However, she preferred the low emotional component in the front of the plane with the pilots!

Likely, there will be 3-4 of these characteristics that are more important than the others.

Which ones are key for you?

Here is a free career reflection worksheet to help you document these characteristics! No registration required.

Whether you are satisfied or dissatisfied with your current job, take the time to understand why! This may take awhile, but when you are done, you will have a filter that will help you identify the work environment that is right for you!

Does this sound interesting? These 7 areas come from the Cure for Career Insanity?

I will be blogging on these five steps for the Cure for Career Insanity over the next few months. I plan to launch the Cure for Career Insanity Webinar series in May. This will be a very affordable (under $25) five part webinar series which will be recorded and offered as an online course. If you are interested in learning more please register to receive updates!

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

The Best of Career Pivot for 2013

Best of Career Pivot

Best of Career PivotI want to thank everyone who has read this blog for all of your support.

Most Viewed in 2013

I wanted to highlight the most viewed blog posts for 2013 that were written in 2013:

There is an obvious trend! I blogged about Long Term Unemployment and Baby Boomers last March as I prepared for a presentation on the topic. Traffic to the website doubled that month.

The other topics were related to resources, social media and talents and skills.

Most Viewed from Past Years

These are blog posts that were written in 2011 or 2012 that get found everyday by people searching:

So you can see there is a lot angst out in the work world on what to do next?

Does that surprise you?

It surprised me at first but not anymore.

As we move to 2014 and beyond I want to wish everyone a joyous and prosperous 2014!

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Happy Holidays from Career Pivot

Happy Holidays

Happy HolidaysI want to wish everyone a very happy holiday season.

I want to congratulate everyone who found their dream job in 2013.

I want to remind those who have been among the long term unemployed that 2014 will be the year they find their next gig.

This is the time of year to count your blessings and give thanks for what you do have.

This is also a great time to plan for 2014 and develop your 2014 career development plan.

Finally, I want to thank everyone who read this blog, made a comment or shared it socially.

A lot was accomplished in 2013:

All of this could not been accomplished without your support!

THANK YOU!

I wish everyone a happy holiday season and a prosperous new year!

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

The Key to a Successful Career Shift: Asking for Help

Asking for HelpAsking for Help

My colleague was in her 20s. I was old enough to be her father. But I had switched careers in midlife to be a math teacher in an inner city school, where I could tell that she knew what she was doing. I, on the other hand, was ready to jump out the window.

(More: This post first appeared on PBS NextAvenue.org in February of 2013)

So I asked her for help. Begged might be a better word. If she would give me her lesson plans, I figured, I would follow her every move, like a little puppy dog — a 6-foot-4-inch puppy with hair loss and wrinkles — until I got the hang of teaching. Voila!

Advice From a Career-Design Coach

I’ve made seven career changes, currently work as a career-design coach for other boomers and just wrote Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers. My experience and research has shown me that asking for help is the biggest hurdle people in midlife face when shifting careers. But it’s also the essential first step.

We really struggle, however, before asking others for assistance. It’s hard to swallow your pride, forgo speeches to new, young co-workers that begin “I was doing such and such before you were born” and instead say, “I need help.”

Men Are Often the Most Reluctant

Asking for help changing careers is especially tough for men. (Kind of like asking for directions.) I know that’s a blanket generalization, but research backs me up.

Women tend to work cooperatively; men tend to compete for the alpha position. And requesting guidance is a definite concession of the alpha spot.

5 Strategies to Ask for Help Shifting Careers
But if you’re considering a career shift — whether you’re a man or a woman — and want to increase your chances of success, I suggest you adopt these five strategies to ask for help:

1. Craft a sharp elevator pitch. To get answers to your questions about entering a field, you need to be able to clearly state the type of work you want to do. A 30-second elevator pitch is the best way to get your message across. (Next Avenue’s work and volunteering blogger, Nancy Collamer, has tips on how to create one in her post, “The Perfect Elevator Pitch to Land a Job.”)

Once you’ve perfected your elevator pitch, share it not just with others who already have a job like the one you want, but with everyone you meet. You never know who’ll have the keys to unlock the door. Gratefully accept any advice or offers of introductions.

2. Ask for AIR. When you seek out someone in your prospective next career, offer to buy him or her a cup of coffee or lunch. But don’t request an informational interview; that says you want a job and can scare people off. Instead, ask for AIR: advice, insights and recommendations.

Advice Tips on what it takes to break in and succeed.

(More : Asking for AIR – Advice, Insights, and Recommendations)

Insights The kinds of things someone usually learns after years in the field: the skinny about its culture, politics, pitfalls and key players. You want to learn who is on top and why. Then you’ll have a better sense of how to make your own way.

Recommendations Find out who you should talk to next and ask, if appropriate, for an introduction. Request names of good books to read and classes to take, as well as industry groups that can help you start networking effectively.

3. Cultivate your tribe. A tribe is the group of your friends and relatives who are pulling for you. They’re the ones who’ll hold your hand through the career shift and support you when you’re discouraged.

(More : Cultivating Your Tribe for Career Success)

Asking for help isn’t just about getting questions answered; sometimes, it’s about assisting you emotionally when things aren’t going well. Your tribe will be there for you when you make mistakes — and when you triumph.

Make a habit of connecting with members of your tribe individually, meeting for coffee or a walk. Share the latest steps of your journey. They’ll help you stay sane and likely draw inspiration from your story.

4. Admit your weaknesses to people who could assist you. One of the hardest parts about asking for help when changing careers is telling others what you don’t know.

Say you’ve been a curmudgeon about social media, proudly (if privately) never joining Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn. Since social media can introduce you to people in your new field and help you stay up on its latest news, now’s the time to confess your ignorance to someone you know who’s an ace at social media and ask for an informal 101 course.

5. Say thank you. Every time someone is useful in your career transition, show your appreciation and spread the word. If his introduction led to a job interview, tell him and express your gratitude. People like knowing they have helped.

The Bottom Line
I’m firmly convinced that nobody makes a successful career change without the help of others.

You may start off feeling like a panhandler. But you’ll quickly see that, in addition to a free cup of coffee, your questions give people the chance to show off as experts. And that makes everyone feel good.

Just be sure to be as willing to give as good as you get. While you’re asking for help, someone might ask you to share insights. Do so with gusto. Karma works!

This post later appeared on Forbes.com in February of 2013!

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

BoomerJobTips – Curated Career Content for October 13

BoomerJobTipsBoomerJobTips Update

Welcome to this weeks BoomerJobTips Update the central point to get current career information for the Baby Boomer Generation!

Check BoomerJobTips Daily for the latest curated career content. Content is curated from hundreds of the leading career websites with a focus on baby boomer career issues.

Most Popular

Job Search

Personal Brand

Baby Boomer

Career

Social Media

Career Pivot

Another way to look at the same links AND MORE from BoomerJobTips.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Are Baby Boomers Ignored by the Career Industry?

Baby Boomers Ignored

Baby Boomers ignored?

Why am I asking whether Baby boomers feel ignored?

Last week, I dissected the Forbes Top 100 Career Websites list. Career services are a booming business and particularly servicing the millennial generation.

There were close to thirty websites that provided general career services. There were half that many that specifically target the millennial generation.

Career Pivot was the only focused on career issues for baby boomers who either cannot or do not want to retire.

Well… that is not quite true, My Lifestyle Career and Encore focus on baby boomers but are a bit more focused.

Baby Boomers are not used to being ignored!

Why is this career industry ignoring baby boomers?

Let’s time travel back to 1999. Did any of you have any question about your ability to retire back in 1999?

My guess is NO!

The AARP website was all about retiring to the good life.

Other than Monster.com, Careerbuilder.com and other smaller job boards, the online career industry did not exist.

Let’s fast forward to 2007. We had survived the dot com bust and the stock market was roaring. The online career industry had been launched with websites like Indeed, SimplyHired and of course, LinkedIn. The first millennials were just starting to graduate from college and starting their careers.

Then came 2008 and the start of the great recession. It was first time a lot of baby boomers realized that retirement would look very different than they planned.

AARP still had virtually nothing on their website related to careers.

We are now in 2013 and AARP has just launched their Life Re-Imagined website. Hmmm… are they finally realizing that 80% of baby boomers will not retire as planned?

Baby Boomers have always redefined just about everything about their lives.  We are just late coming to this party. It appears that career services are waking up to the special needs of baby boomers but more on that next week!

What are your plans?

Do you plan to retire? I do not plan to retire but to work less at something I love!

Do you feel ignored? Do you feel baby boomers have been ignored?

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Forbes Top 100 Websites for your Career

Forbes Top 100 WebsitesCareer Pivot made the Forbes Top 100 Websites for your Career

We made the Forbes Top 100 Websites for your Career list with a website that is only 19 months old. I say “we” because I could not have done this without your support. I first want to say

Thank You!

Let’s take a look at who is on the list!

In this post, I want to point out websites that might be very useful in managing your career. My next post, I will be looking at what is not there.

The list is loaded with big names:

  1. CareerBuilder
  2. About.com/Careers 
  3. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  4. Dice.com
  5. Glassdoor
  6. Idealist.org
  7. Indeed
  8. LinkedIn
  9. Monster.com
  10. Recruiter.com
  11. Salary.com
  12. Simply Hired
  13. TheLadders
  14. Twitter
  15. USAJobs

All of these websites are well established and funded. These are either corporate, government, or non-profit.

What sites on the Forbes Top 100 Websites should you consider following:

My Lifestyle Career
Thinking about working on a part-time basis during your retirement? Career coach Nancy Collamer, author of Second-Act Careers: 50+ Ways to Profit from Your Passions During Semi-Retirement offers advice on career reinvention, lifestyle-friendly income ideas and the best resources for boomers eager to leave the 9 to 5 workplace behind.

Note – Nancy is a regular contributor to PBS NextAvenue. I have reviewed her book on Amazon. You can read my review here.

Jibberjobber
Jibberjobber was originally designed to help people organize and track their job search—but has since evolved into a “personal relationship manager” that allows you to manage your job search and optimize your network relationships for the duration of your career. The site was designed by Jason Alba during his first real job search in early 2006. Membership to the website is free, but users can pay to upgrade their account to Silver ($60/year) or Premium ($99/year) status—which offers additional features.

Note – I personally know the Jibberjobber founder, Jason Alba, and he is a true visionary in this arena. I use Jibberjobber in my business and recommend it’s use to my clients. Jason recently published his latest book 51 Alternatives to a Real Job. I have not read this book as yet but plan to write a review before the end of the year.

Pivot Planet
Pivot Planet, a resource for finding real-life career and start-up business advice shared by experienced advisers who can answer your questions and offer insights into their profession anywhere, anytime (for $50+ an hour), is the brainchild of Brian Kurth, founder of the in-person career mentorship company VocationVacations. Pivot Planet connects people around the world looking to “pivot” from an existing career to a new one–or to enhance their current job skills with expert advisers working in hundreds of fields. The advisers provide one-on-one video and phone sessions—and some even offer the option of in-person mentorship.

Note – Brian relocated to Austin Texas in the last year and I have gotten to know this fine gentleman. He has a true passion in helping people. In fact, PivotPlanet was in the NY Times last week — Taste-Testing a Second Career, With a Mentor. Great read

Personal Branding Blog
Founded in 2007 by Dan Schawbel, managing partner at Millennial Branding, a Boston-based company that does research and consulting on Generation Y, Personal Branding Blog offers information about how to create your personal brand. The blog includes video podcasts, interviews with branding specialists, research reports, articles and games. Schawbel is also a Forbes.com contributor and the author of Me 2.0, Revised and Updated Edition: 4 Steps to Building Your Future and Promote Yourself: The New Rules for Career Success

Note – I write a weekly blog post for this website that appears every Sunday. The same article appears the following Wednesday on this blog. Personal Branding is key to every baby boomers future. It is important that you get a thorough grasp of this topic.

Next week, I will make some observations of what is not on the Forbes Top 100 Websites for your career list.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist