Why Are You Not Being Found? Try Thinking Like a Recruiter

To Be Found, You Need to Think Like a Recruiter

Most of the time, the reason you are not being found is because you are not thinking like a recruiter. Recruiters are using LinkedIn to search for talent using specific strategies.

Think of this like dating. If you want to find a mate, you need to hang out where the opposite sex can find you. When I was a young man, that meant belonging to social organizations or clubs and hanging out with friends. When I got older, it also meant going to bars and doing other activities—I met my wife playing volleyball through an informal Sunday evening volleyball group.

If you want to be found by recruiters, then you need to understand the strategies recruiters use to search LinkedIn. This way, you can be found by recruiters…just like you wanted to be found by the opposite sex.

Let’s start with the basics.

search current titleCurrent Job Title

Recruiters use LinkedIn Advanced Search to find people. They start by using the current job title field. Having a current job title is critical to being found.

In the image to the right, the recruiter is searching for individuals who have product manager as their current title.

The image below lists one of my contact’s current title as  Sr. Product Manager, and it is the current title because the end date of the position is current.

 

current title product managerWhat if you are unemployed? Create a position!

I have a shell consulting company called Global Basis Consulting. When I was unemployed, this was my current position. If you look at my LinkedIn profile you will find the following:

globalbasis

If I were to sell Career Pivot, I would could change the Global Basis Consulting end date to present and I would have a current position.

You have to have a current position to be found!

Current Job Title Contents

Your current job title should be as descriptive as possible AND give multiple variations, if needed.

For example, let’s say you are a product manager. What kind of product manager?

Software Product Manager

Can you add any keywords? Like Software as a Service (SaaS) or Agile?

SaaS Agile Product Manager

Let’s say you also handle product marketing for the product.

SaaS Agile Product Manager | Product Marketing Manager

Now you will be found if a recruiter is searching for a Product Manager OR a Product Marketing Manager.

Let me be clear, you cannot lie. Only use job titles that fit your current job!

current title keywordsKeywords

Besides searching job titles, recruiters will use keywords to find prospects—as shown in the image to the right. In this case, the recruiter is looking for a product manager with Software as a Service (SaaS) experience.

The results of the search will list profiles with the current title of Product Manager that also includes SaaS in their profile. The more times SaaS appears in the profile, the higher it will appear in the ranking.

You need to place keywords in your summary and in your current and past positions.

DO NOT KEYWORD STUFF.

The easiest way to do this is to place a keyword entry at the end of each section. A good example is to look at the Summary section of my LinkedIn Profile.

summary_keywords

Using this method, it is very obvious what I am doing. Place a keyword section at the bottom of each section.

Do not use keywords that are not valid for the section.

Connecting with Recruiters

You should connect with recruiters at your target companies. If you are following my Targeted Job Search Strategy, you will know how to strategically connect with recruiters.

If you are a 1st degree connection of the recruiter who is searching, you appear higher in his rankings. Recruiters move around a lot. They move between companies that needs their services. They carry their connections with them. Over a period of time, having a lot of recruiters in your network will be very beneficial.

Do you now understand why you are not being found?

What is you next step?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my latest book which is available on Amazon.com!

Personal Branding for Baby Boomers: What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

#3 Method to Find Companies – LinkedIn Company Pages

LinkedIn Company Pages

Linkedin company pagesUsing LinkedIn company pages is the third method you should use to find companies that can hire you. If you have not read the first two, now is the time to review the posts on Weak Ties and LinkedIn Advanced Search.

LinkedIn company pages are a valuable resource in managing your career. They offer you background on the company, stream of posts and announcements, and two hidden gems.

These two gems are:

  • “Similar Companies” on LinkedIn Mobile App or “People Also Viewed” on LinkedIn Company Page
  • Listing of everyone who works for the company who have profiles on LinkedIn

Both of these are great for researching companies.

Similar Companies

Pick a company that you are interested in and go to their company page. In the bottom right hand corner, you will find the “People Also Viewed” section.

In this example, I have chosen to research Spredfast, an Austin based Social Media startup. The “People Also Viewed” section looks like this:

similar companiesYou can click on each company logo to discover what these companies do. They usually include direct competitors, companies in adjacent industries, or companies that have complimentary products. Go to the “People Also Viewed”  for each of these LinkedIn Company Pages and keep digging. You will likely discover companies that you did not know existed.

LinkedIn Mobile App

Now, I want you to go to the main LinkedIn mobile app. If you have not installed it on your smart phone, install it now. Search for Spredfast LinkedIn company page. You screen should look like this:

spredfast mobileScroll to the bottom. spredfast_mobile_bottomWhen you tap on “Similar Companies,” you will get the following list:

spredfast similar companies

For me, this listed 32 LinkedIn company pages. Tap on each company, go to the “Similar Companies” section, and repeat.

Think of this as following bread crumbs. Although it can be quite tedious, I have had a couple of clients discover companies in adjacent industries or having complimentary products who ended up hiring them.

LinkedIn Company Pages – How You’re Connected

In the top right hand corner of every LinkedIn company page, you will find the “How You’re Connected” section.

How_Your_ConnectedYou will immediately see if you have any 1st degree connections. This is the Spredfast company page, and I have two first degree connections.

Your next move is to click on “See all.”

Let’s say I lived in Boston. I want to see if Spredfast has any employees in Boston.

Spredfast Boston

I would add Boston as a location. After I click on search, I discover the following.

Spredfast_Boston_1

Because of this, I know there are six Spredfast employees in the Boston area. I can now work on ways to reach out to these people to see what they do and how they like working for the company.

LinkedIn Company Pages

LinkedIn company pages are most valuable when you have a well-defined niche. If you are a sales manager for manufacturing equipment in the food packaging business, then this works very well.

However, if you are a corporate CPA and can work for just about anyone in any industry, you will need to find a different…more focused…strategy in looking for companies that can hire you.

Let me know if you found this valuable. Comment below or share it on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my latest book which is available on Amazon.com!

PBfBB_kCover-02Personal Branding for Baby Boomers: What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

#2 Method to Find Companies – LinkedIn Advanced Search

LinkedIn Advanced Search

LinkedIn Advanced SearchLinkedIn Advanced Search is a powerful tool to find people. More importantly, it is a powerful tool to find companies that have problems you can solve or that can hire you.

In my previous post, I discussed using weak ties to find companies that can hire you.

Now, we want to find people who look, smell, and sound like you…and see where they are working.

We are going to use LinkedIn Advanced Search to query for some very specific information which includes:

  • Job Title – People who have the job title you currently have or desire to have
  • Certification – People who have certifications that are the same or similar to what you have attained
  • Keywords – Profiles that contain the same keywords that you use

LinkedIn Advanced Search – Job Title

LinkedIn Advanced Search Current TitleFor example, I want to find people in my area who have the current job title “Product Manager.”

I fill in three fields in the LinkedIn Advanced Search form:

  • Title – Product Manager
  • Set status to Current
  • Location to Austin, Texas Area (where I live)

I click on Search.

What appears is a list of LinkedIn profiles of people who have  Product Manager as their current job title and have their LinkedIn location set to Austin, Texas Area.

These individuals live in Austin, Texas Area, but this does not mean the business they work for is located in the Austin, Texas Area.

LinkedIn Advanced Search List

There are 2,590 profiles that meet my criteria, but the image to the left displays the first four.

Notice that the third entry is an individual whose headlines says Product Manager at Insights.

I can tell that Insights is a UK based company. I never knew that Insights had an office Austin. They may not have one. All I know right now is they have at least one employee in Austin.

How many employees does this company have in Austin?

I can find that out by going to the Insights LinkedIn company page.

LinkedIn_Advanced_Search_Company_Page

On the right hand side of their company page you will see how you are connected. There are 462 employees on LinkedIn. How many are in Austin? Click on See All.

LinkedIn_Advanced_Search_LocationsI clicked Add, which allowed me to type in Austin, Texas Area.

Insights has 68 employees in the Austin, Texas Area.

Does Insights have an office in the Austin, Texas Area?

I do not know, but I now know they have some kind of presence and that at least one of their employees is a Product Manager.

This may be a company with:

  • A satellite office
  • Remote employees working from home

Repeat this process for each job title variation. In this case, you might repeat using Product Management or Product Marketing.

Now, it is time to do your research on the company.

LinkedIn Advanced Search – Certifications

Next, I can perform the same type of search looking for certifications or degrees. I might search for:

  • Technical certifications like CCNA (Cisco) or MCP Microsoft
  • Human Resource Certifications like SPHR
  • Project Management Institute Certifications like PMP
  • University Degrees like MBA or PhD.
  • Professional Credentials like CPA or PE

Use the same process in searching for certifications as your did for job titles.

LinkedIn Advanced Search – Keywords

Finally, use keywords alone or in combination with either job titles or certifications.

For example, if you were looking for:

  • HR generalist role
  • At a manufacturing company
  • SPHR certification is desired

You might want to use keywords manufacturing or manufacturer, SPHR in the last name field, and HR or Human Resources in the title field.

You will need to experiment with different title variations and keywords. If you are comfortable with Boolean searches,  you can add AND or OR to the search terms. You can download a LinkedIn Boolean Search Tip sheet here.

This is time consuming, however, you will find that there are real gems to be found using LinkedIn Advanced Search. You will find companies that you had no idea had a presence in your community.

What search terms are you going to use?

Check out the rest of the social job search series.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my latest book which is available on Amazon.com!

PBfBB_kCover-02Personal Branding for Baby Boomers: What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

The Difference Between Following and Connecting on LinkedIn

Yes, there is a difference between following and connecting on LinkedIn.

You can see the status updates of someone you do not know on LinkedIn and their long-form posts (LinkedIn’s blogging equivalent)- without connecting.

(Note: this is a guest post by Hannah Morgan, aka, the Career Sherpa)

Some LinkedIn Users Won’t Connect With Strangers

One of the biggest debates by LinkedIn users is who you should connect with.

LinkedIn says

“We recommend only inviting people you know and trust because 1st-degree connections are given access to the primary email address on your account.”

As a result, many users will NOT accept invitations to connect unless they know you. Conversely, some people are LIONS (LinkedIn Open Networkers) and will connect with anyone who invites them.

As you can see, people have different opinions.

If you really want to stay in touch with someone these are a couple of workarounds.

Two Ways to Get Updates and Stay In Touch With Someone On LinkedIn

If you want to connect with someone you don’t personally know, try either of these options.

1) Always customize your invitation to connect.

Explain why you are interested in connecting with someone in your customized invitation. It isn’t a guarantee that your invitation will be accepted, but it may increase the chances.  Learn how to customize your invitation on LinkedIn’s desktop and mobile app.

2) Follow the person on LinkedIn.

This is how LinkedIn describes the differences between following and connecting.

Connections are two-way relationships of trust between people who know each other. If you’re connected to someone, you’re following them and they’re following you by default.

Following allows you to read – right on your homepage – what members are sharing publicly on LinkedIn, including content that they’ve created such as long-form posts. You can follow someone without being connected to them.

You’ll only be able to follow if the person has either written a long-form post or changed their privacy settings to enable updates to be publically follow-able.

Follow Influencers & Media

So if you want to follow some of LinkedIn’s Influencers (big name, famous people) click on this link to see who you can follow.

If you want to follow people, who have posted long-form posts, go to their LinkedIn profile, click on one of their posts, and you will see the FOLLOW button.

follow long post LIA sure fire way to follow someone’s public updates on LinkedIn is to go to their profile and click on the down arrow next to the connect button and select the FOLLOW option (if the user has made this available).

Publishers, Speakers, Business Owners, etc.

If you are a speaker, writer, famous alumni or business owner, you may be receiving a lot of requests to connect. One option is to allow/suggest people follow your public updates- but be sure you change your privacy settings.

LinkedIn’s Help Center post Managing Who Can Follow Your Updates explains how:

While your 1st-degree connections automatically follow your updates and long-form posts, anyone can follow you, even if they’re not in your network. You can limit followers to only your 1st-degree connections from the Privacy & Settings page.

  1. Move your cursor over your profile photo in the top right of your homepage and select Privacy & Settings.

    • You may be prompted to sign in.
  2. Under the Privacy Controls section, select Choose who can follow your updates.

  3. Select Everyone or Your Connections.

    • Everyone – All LinkedIn members, in and outside your network, can follow your updates.
    • Your connections – Only your 1st-degree connections can follow your updates.
  4. Click Save changes.

How To Handle Requests To Connect From Strangers

In an interesting discussion thread on Facebook, people were discussing how they handle requests from strangers. Some said they send a reply to the invitation, requesting the sender to explain how they know each other or why they want to connect. The response rate to those emails was mixed. As a business owner, accepting invitations from people you don’t know may not bother you, these are leads, right? But even LinkedIn is seeing it’s share of spam accounts, so be aware.

You may choose to send a reply message in which you’ve copied the instructions above. Your message might also explain your logic for not connecting with people you do not know.

What do you do when people you do not know invite you to connect on LinkedIn without customizing their request?  

This post originally appeared as The Difference Between Following and Connecting on LinkedIn on The Career Sherpa blog on September 8, 2015

Who is Career Sherpa, aka Hannah Morgan?

My mission: Guiding new job seekers through the treacherous terrain of job search by providing a map and tools to navigate today’s competitive landscape.

My passion: Helping the wandering and lost job seeker to understand how to look for work better.

To learn more visit CareerSherpa.net or feel free to join Hannah on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus or check out her LinkedIn profile.

Note from Marc Miller:

Hannah and I were listed in the article 50 Great People To Follow On LinkedIn, No Matter Your Industry. This is a great honor but… the flood of LinkedIn connection requests that followed was a bit much.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaper “Don’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Getting Noticed – LinkedIn Publisher and Shareability

Getting Noticed

getting noticedIt is all about getting noticed when creating and promoting your personal brand.

I know, I know. I will hear from a lot of you that getting noticed is not what we were raised to do.

LinkedIn Publisher, LinkedIn’s blogging platform, gives you exposure to your entire LinkedIn network…and more. If you do it right, you will have to opportunity to be found by millions.

Why Publish?

There are two common reasons to publish long-form posts on LinkedIn Publisher:

  • Getting noticed by hiring companies and having your profile viewed
  • Getting noticed by prospective clients and driving traffic to your website

You should write and format your post differently depending your goals.

Constructing Your Post for Shareability

When you create great content in the form of long-form posts on LinkedIn publisher, you want people to share it. The more people that share it, the more visibility you get.

I have had multiple LinkedIn Publisher long-form posts get incredible exposure:

These four posts have accumulated 1.6 Million Views. How did these four post gain such attention?

Shareability! These posts were shared and shared and shared. If you posts are shared you are getting noticed!

How is Your Post Found?

When you publish a long-form post on LinkedIn, your connections and followers will be informed in their LinkedIn streams about your post. The larger your network, the more people who initially see the post. Getting noticed by your network is the easy part.

If a LinkedIn editor likes your post, they can put it on a LinkedIn Pulse Channel. You know that your post has been selected when you see an image at the bottom of your post.pulse channel

This greatly expands the audience who will initially see your post. Carefully review the various Pulse channels and select a few where your content fits. Review the posts that are not written by LinkedIn influencers. These are the posts written by ordinary people like you and me that were selected by LinkedIn editors for the Pulse channel. Review these posts looking for common themes. This may give you a hint on why they were selected.

It is important how you position yourself in getting noticed by a LinkedIn editor.

Enticing the Reader to Click on Your Post

The two components of your post that will get someone to initially read and click on your post are:

  • Title
  • Header Image

The easiest way to find winning post titles is to examine the top posts on the Pulse channel you have selected. The two most common methods are:

The LinkedIn Publisher header image is key to getting noticed. The recommended image header size is 698 x 400.

I use Canva.com for most of my images. Canva allows you to add text and effects to the image. If you use their stock photos, they charge US$1 per image. You can also upload your own images and edit them for free. Another site I use is 123rf.com for stock images.

I have gotten feedback that the following image attracted many to click on my 4 Signs That You Are Working for a Failing Company post.

failing company

 Writing for Shareability

To get noticed, you need readers to share your post.

I attended a session at South by Southwest Interactive conference called The Art and Science of Shareability.  I walked away with a couple of simple concepts.

  • Write to a niche where the readers will share among themselves to garner a substantial portion of that niche. This is different from traditional journalism where you write to 80% of the market and hope to garner a small share.
  • Have an emotional hook. People will share content that they can relate to emotionally.

The common themes in the posts I listed above were:

  • I stated the obvious. In 4 Signs That You Are Working for a Failing Company, I did not tell you anything that you did not already know instinctively—but no one talks about the signs!
  • I did not give a complete solution…or any solution at all. This encourages dialog and participation. When people comment, the post and their comments are shared with their connections and followers.
  • Ask for their opinion. In The Purple Cow Job Description – Should I Apply, I quote a Harvard Business Review article which stated that women were less likely to apply for job unless they were 100% qualified. I asked, “Ladies, is this true based on your experience?” I received hundreds of comments saying yes.

Give this a try. In the session on Shareability, the presenter said you will have plenty of duds before you have a winner. With each post, you will learn what works and what does not.

Let me know what works for you in getting noticed!
Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paper “Strategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Do Others Prejudge You Based on Your LinkedIn Profile?

prejudge

NickandZuzu.com

Do You Prejudge Someone After Looking at their LinkedIn Profile?

Thom Singer’s keynote speech at Product Camp Austin 14 was on how someone decided to prejudge him based on seeing him speak. This person thought that she would not like Thom. However, when she actually met him in person, she discovered he was a really nice guy.

She had prejudged him based on seeing him on stage.

Hmmm…do we do the same with LinkedIn and other social media platforms?

Do you prejudge someone when you view their LinkedIn profile?

Do others prejudge you?

LinkedIn Profile

My presentation at Product Camp, “Leveraging LinkedIn – Creating a Professional that People will Remember“, was about establishing your brand on LinkedIn.

People will prejudge you based on your LinkedIn profile.

Yeah, yeah, I know we are not suppose to do that, but we do. This goes hand in hand with all of the discussion about Unintentional Bias.

Let’s discuss what you can do about establishing your brand on LinkedIn. We can then manage how someone might prejudge you!

LinkedIn Picture

I previously wrote a post called 3 Key Elements of your LinkedIn Photograph.
The three key points were:

  • Framing and Clothing
  • Background
  • Chin Line

Recently, I read a LinkedIn Publisher post by Jason Seiden titled What Profile Photo Works Best on LinkedIn: A Real-Life Experiment where Jason tested a variety of photos.

What he determined was the most important factor in the picture was the …….

Background!

Yes, people will prejudge you based on the background of your LinkedIn photo!

Jason’s most successful photo was one where he was a keynote speaker. You could tell that from the background.

Think about it! What does the background of your LinkedIn photo say about you?

SxSWiIf you are attending SxSWi please come to my presentation on this topic!

Headline

The vocabulary you use in your LinkedIn Headline and Summary is critical.

The default LinkedIn headline is “Current Job Title at Company Name”.

The headline is 120 characters long. USE ALL OF IT.

Instead insert phrases like “Product Management” or  “Merges & Acquisitions” and separate each with a “|”.  Check out my LinkedIn profile to see an example.

Yes, people will prejudge you based on the headline.

(More: 1st Place to use Keywords is in your LinkedIn Headline)

Summary

The Summary section of your LinkedIn profile should contain your brand story.

Tell me who you are and not what you have done.

You can tell the reader what you have done in your experience section. I have written a four posts on the process of writing your brand story.

If you want the reader to prejudge you in an authentic way, then tell an authentic story!

We will be prejudged based on our LinkedIn profile. What we want to do is paint an authentic picture of ourselves so that we can develop a real life relationship.

Do you prejudge based on what you see and read online?

By the way, I’m honored to share that my presentation won best session at Product Camp Austin!

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paperThe Multi-Generational WorkplaceMaking Generational Diversity Work

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Anatomy of a Winning LinkedIn Publisher Post

Winning LinkedIn Publisher Post

LinkedIn PublisherLinkedIn launched LinkedIn Publisher earlier this year. Every LinkedIn user now has access to a publishing platform to establish their credibility.

I have used LinkedIn Publisher as a vehicle to republish successful blog posts to a much larger audience. Starting in the middle of June, the first post was published with mixed results. With the exception of one post, views did not exceed 1,700. The one exception was Target the Company and Quit Chasing the Job.

What was special about that post?

It was picked up by LinkedIn Pulse Channel Careers Next Level.

This post generated close to 14,000 views and drove a lot of traffic to the Career Pivot Website. It also generated hundreds of subscriptions to the blog…and much more.

Pretty Successful!

5 Things on Your Resume That Make You Sound Old

On Monday, October 13th at 8 AM CT, I copied the post What Does Your Resume Say About Your Age into LinkedIn Publisher and pushed the publish button. Within a 30 minutes, I received an e-mail from a LinkedIn Publisher editor asking me to change the title to 5 Things on Your Resume That Make You Sound Old. Once again, the post was picked up by LinkedIn Pulse Channel Careers Next Level.

Within an a couple of hours my website was being hammered with views. Around Noon CT the Career Pivot website went down.

As I write this post, the same LinkedIn Publisher post has been viewed over 500,000 times. That is over half a million views!

The after effects have been extraordinary:

  • 100+ Books Sold
  • 250+ Subscriptions to blog
  • 50+ Likes to FB Page
  • 100+ Twitter Follows
  • 2000+ Followers on LinkedIn
IIILogo

Career Pivot Sponsor for the Month of November 2014

What Happened and Why?

So, what was different?

This was a very successful post on the Career Pivot website in June. It had over 4,000 views in just over a few weeks. I knew it was good content. It is not what you think is good, but what your readers think is good!

  • It had a title that was controversial
  • The content was relevant but controversial

When I wrote the original post, I did not think either was controversial.

The five things I listed that make you sound old on your resume are:

  • aol.com
  • Home phone #
  • Home address
  • Defunct or obsolete skills
  • Two spaces after a period

It was the title and the two spaces after a period that got people riled up. I never knew people could get so excited about two spaces after a period!

What was key in being selected for the LinkedIn Pulse Channel?

What do you need to do to be eligible to be selected? I do not know.

This has been a topic on a number of LinkedIn groups and there is no consensus on how this works. Let’s talk about how you might figure this out.

Your Personal Brand and LinkedIn Publisher

Write on topics in which you want to viewed as a thought leader. Select a LinkedIn Pulse Channel that matches your interests. Look at posts in that channel that are not written by a LinkedIn Influencer! You want to find material that was written by an ordinary Joe or Jane like you and me. These posts were selected by the LinkedIn Pulse Editorial staff.

What is common among these posts? Is it the topic? Is it the title? Is it the writing style?

Once you have determined a winning style, how does that fit with your personal brand?

By doing this research, you increase the possibility that your posts will be picked up by the editorial staff of LinkedIn Pulse.

Start Writing

Craft titles the pique people’s interests. As much as I hate to admit it, titles starting with a number get views!

Make sure what you write has a bite to it. Edgy is good!

I encourage all of my clients to start publishing on LinkedIn Publisher. I encourage you to try this yourself.

Be prepared for some negative comments!

If I can produce a winning LinkedIn Publisher post, then you can to. If you were suddenly introduced to half a million people through your post, what would that do to your personal brand?

You might not become famous, but it would likely establish you as someone to follow.

Are you ready to write a winning LinkedIn Publisher Post!

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paperStrategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Promoting Your Brand Using LinkedIn Publisher

LinkedIn Publisher is coming!

LinkedIn PublisherLinkedIn Publisher was finally made available to me last week. LinkedIn Publisher is being rolled out to the entire LinkedIn community in phases.

What is LinkedIn Publisher?

LinkedIn Publisher is the blogging platform that LinkedIn Influencers have been using for the last year or so. LinkedIn Influencers are thought leaders who LinkedIn asked to publish their writings on LinkedIn Pulse.

LinkedIn Publisher will soon be made available to everyone.

Why should you care?

In this global economy, how do potential employers or clients know that you know your stuff? In today’s economy, you need to promote what you know!

What better idea is there than to write about what you know on LinkedIn, where prospective employers and clients can find you?

How do I get started with LinkedIn Publisher?

Step #1 is to get access. To speed up the process, you can apply here.

Once you have access, you will receive an e-mail with instructions and you will see a little pencil in the field where you post your updates.

What should I publish?

What do you know? What skill or knowledge do you have that you would like to promote?
Pick a topic and start writing. I discussed this last year when I wrote about Establishing Your Personal Brand and Credibility Through Blogging. This is the same concept, except you no longer need a blogging platform.
I tell my clients to pick a topic, write multiple posts in a series, and see what people think. What you want is for your LinkedIn connections and others to read, share, and comment on your posts. Based on the response, you will have an idea what you should write about, or whether to switch to a different topic.

How often should I publish?

Be consistent! Pick a frequency that you can maintain. Once a week, every other week, once a month…start by writing 3-5 posts before you publish the first post. You will be able judge pretty quickly whether the frequency you picked is sustainable.

I will be publishing one post a week. I will also be republishing popular posts that I wrote for the Career Pivot blog from the last couple of years.

When should I publish?

In my opinion, early in the week and early in the day works best. This depends on where your readers might live or work. When I first started writing on the Career Pivot blog in 2011, I had readers in Iraq and Afghanistan (US Military). You might consider shifting the publishing time based on the time zone where most of your readers live.

How will readers find my posts?

If you subscribe to LinkedIn pulse, you get an e-mail every morning with articles that might interest you. LinkedIn will send to everyone who is subscribed to LinkedIn pulse and is a first degree connection a link to your article.

You should also promote your post on Twitter, FaceBook, LinkedIn, and Google+.  LinkedIn Publisher will inform you of how many people viewed your post and shared it on the various social networks. You will also be able to read and respond to comments.

You now have a simple to use, free blogging platform that makes it easy for your LinkedIn connections to find your posts. Now you can demonstrate that you know your stuff!

When are you going to get started?

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s White Paper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest white paper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

LinkedIn Endorsements Updated – FINALLY!

LinkedIn Endorsements

Linkedin EndorsementsMany of you have grown tired of LinkedIn Endorsements and being prompted to endorse your connections. Many of you have also grown tired of getting LinkedIn endorsements from people you have never worked with or getting LinkedIn endorsements for skills that you do not have like underwater basket weaving. (I do know of someone who received this endorsement). That is changing!

LinkedIn Endorsements Changes

If you edit your profile and scroll down to the “Skills & Endorsements” section and select edit You will be given four options.

I want to be endorsed

For most of us we want to be endorsed. Hey why wouldn’t I want to be endorsed?

If you are a financial adviser or any other position that is heavily regulated, they cannot be endorsed. This has been a real problem for financial advisers. Do not endorse your stock broker, insurance agent, fee based financial adviser…you create problems for them!

Do you want your connections to be prompted to endorse you? WOW that is a tough one. I have so many endorsements that the answer is probably no but…I am not sure on this one. I will leave the box checked for the time being.

This is one box that I will uncheck. I no longer want to be harassed to endorse my connections.

If I want to endorse someone I will explicitly go into their profile and endorse them. I have to do the same to make a recommendation.

If someone endorses me I still want know. Specifically, if they endorse me for a skill I do not possess I really want to know about it.

 Reorder Your Skills

It is a subtle change but you can now re-order your skills. Bring the skills that you want to LinkedIn endorsements to the top. This has two effects:

  1. Your connections will be prompted for the skills at the top of your list
  2. You will come up hirer is search rankings for the skills that you want to be found

Other LinkedIn Changes

There are a lot of other changes other than LinkedIn Endorsements that are coming.

 New LinkedIn Inbox

The inbox has been enhanced to be easier to use. For more information check out LinkedInExpert’s post.

New LinkedIn Groups Page

If you used the LinkedIn groups page in the past it has been fairly clumsy going in between groups. Now it has been greatly streamlined.

New LinkedIn Group Digest E-Mail Formats

If you belong to LinkedIn groups you may have noticed the changes to the digest e-mail formats. LinkedIn is currently beta-testing several formats and we will see which one wins.

LinkedIn Publisher

LinkedIn is opening up their publishing platform to everyone. Today, it is only for key influencers. They are slowly opening this up to everyone. Currently, you have to apply for early access. I applied several weeks ago and am still waiting for access.

LinkedInChat Tweetchat

If you want to stay up to date on changes to LinkedIn, participate in the weekly Tweetchat called LinkedInChat. This tweetchat is run by my friend Viveka von Rosen, aka @LinkedInExpert.  Her trusty sidekick, Steve Cassady, @SteveCassady is always there to assist.

I know the changes are happening fast and furious on LinkedIn right now. Hopefully, this update helps you keep up with how to create, manage and promote your personal brand.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

————————————————

Registration is now open for the Cure for Career Insanity Webinar series

Check it out!

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

‘Court’ a Hiring Manager Without Seeming Like a Creep

Use LinkedIn to get on the radar of your target companies.

LinkedInIn the professional world, much of what is experienced is passive recruiting – where recruiters are out looking for talent among those who are already employed (and not job-seeking). This practice is similar to being courted, which produces good feelings. Though one may still turn down the offer, the fact remains – it is still nice to be pursued.

(This article originally appeared on US News Money and Careers Section February 27, 2014)

Many professionals are starting to take overt actions in preparation for this “courtship.” They begin by asking which companies they would like to be a part of and which cultural dynamics line up with their own.

Build a target list of companies. The first preparatory step is to create a list of companies that hire candidates with your skill-set. Which companies might hire you?

Utilizing LinkedIn’s advanced search helps many people research applicable job titles, highlighted skills and referenced certifications. An example of this is a project manager who has PMP certification. He or she can generate a LinkedIn advanced search where the last name contains PMP while at the same time specifying the desired location using zip code.

Look at local business journals and newspapers for their annual best places to work reports. Investigate these lists carefully, as a company that is great to work for today may not be one tomorrow. Company culture is an ever-shifting dynamic, and many who have worked at these places would not agree that they are ideal. There is a reason why “past performance does not necessarily predict future results” is a popular sentiment.

Vet the target list. A list is not worth much unless it’s acted upon, so the next step is just that. Connect with a target company’s current employees by requesting lunch or coffee meetings. Try to gain a clear understanding of their satisfaction. They may even be willing to introduce you to their colleagues.

Conversely, it is worthwhile to also speak to people who have left the company. Finding these people on LinkedIn by using advanced search and selecting “past but not current” in the company field makes this process easy. These folks are often the most honest about company culture, and are therefore worth the time and effort to pursue.

Remember that building a company list takes time and periodic re-evaluation. Contact lists should be grown with care and precision, adding to them maybe once every week or two.

Take this concept even further by asking for an introduction to the company recruiter. The above steps should be taken when one is not looking for a job, thus creating a more open conversation flow. The whole point is to broaden your network now so that you know where opportunities may exist in the future.

Promote a personal brand. The next step in this process is to promote a personal brand. Who needs to know that you know your stuff? When answering this question, also consider where people spend time on social media. It might be Facebook or Twitter, and don’t forget the professional value of LinkedIn. Most professionals and companies have profiles on this website, and this fact, combined with the extensive advanced search capabilities, makes LinkedIn an incredibly helpful tool in sharing personal brand. It’s wise to join the same groups that people on your list have joined, so that you may contribute actively and establish yourself as having the character and vision your personal brand exemplifies.

Twitter’s list feature is also good for tracking the activity of those with whom you care to associate. Systematically retweet and favorite some of their compelling content. In this manner, you will be noticed without being considered a stalker.

This concept of being where your target list of people are is no different than how teens hang out where their friends or crushes are. It improves the chances of being noticed in a less aggressive manner. You don’t want to appear to be a jerk.

Hiring managers at your target companies will learn that you know your stuff. This is a slow, methodical process. There is a tremendous parallel between finding a date and finding a new job. We all want to be asked out.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

(This article originally appeared on US News Money and Careers Section February 27, 2014)

————————————————

Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group