You Did Not Get the Job! Now What?

You did not get the job! What do you do now?

get the jobYou just got the rejection notice that said you did not get the job you really wanted.

What could have happened:

  • There was a more qualified candidate than you for this position.
  • You did not demonstrate one or more attributes that they were looking for in a candidate. You may have those qualities, but you did not convey them in the hiring process.
  • There was an internal candidate that was deemed a safer hirer.
  • They just made a mistake and hired the wrong person.

You did not get the job. That is true—but let’s create a process where you can learn and grow from the experience.

What are you going to do now?

Post Interview

Immediately after the interview, consider doing the following:

  • Write a personalized, hand-written thank you note to everyone you interviewed with. If possible, hand carry them to the office where you interviewed.
  • Write a personalized e-mail to everyone you interviewed with.
  • Send a LinkedIn request to everyone you interviewed with.

Post-Rejection Notice

After you have been informed that you did not get the job, consider doing the following:

  • E-mail the hiring manager, thanking him or her for the opportunity to interview for the position. Mention that you would like to be considered for other opportunities in the future.
  • E-mail others that you interviewed with, and thank them for their time. Ask them for any feedback that they may be able to provide.
  • If you followed the Targeted Job Search strategy and Targeted the Company , you should have had an employee referral. If so, then ask your referral to do some detective work.

1-2 Months Later

Monitor LinkedIn for changes in the department that you interviewed:

  • Check to see who was hired for the position.
  • If it was an external candidate, check to see how their credentials compare to yours. Were they better qualified?
  • Send a connection request to the individual who was hired.

3-6 Months Later

Reach out to person hired and ask to meet for coffee or lunch. Ask for AIR – Advice, Insights and Recommendations!

What could happen:

  • The person who was hired might not work out. I have seen this happen!
  • They might open up other positions for which you will be a better fit.
  • You could learn that the person they hired was better qualified and a better fit.

I recently had a client that was hired a year after the person they hired did not work out, and they changed the job description to better fit my client’s qualifications.

When you do not get the job of your dreams, be persistent and do not let inertia set in!

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

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Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Promoting Your Brand Using LinkedIn Publisher

LinkedIn Publisher is coming!

LinkedIn PublisherLinkedIn Publisher was finally made available to me last week. LinkedIn Publisher is being rolled out to the entire LinkedIn community in phases.

What is LinkedIn Publisher?

LinkedIn Publisher is the blogging platform that LinkedIn Influencers have been using for the last year or so. LinkedIn Influencers are thought leaders who LinkedIn asked to publish their writings on LinkedIn Pulse.

LinkedIn Publisher will soon be made available to everyone.

Why should you care?

In this global economy, how do potential employers or clients know that you know your stuff? In today’s economy, you need to promote what you know!

What better idea is there than to write about what you know on LinkedIn, where prospective employers and clients can find you?

How do I get started with LinkedIn Publisher?

Step #1 is to get access. To speed up the process, you can apply here.

Once you have access, you will receive an e-mail with instructions and you will see a little pencil in the field where you post your updates.

What should I publish?

What do you know? What skill or knowledge do you have that you would like to promote?
Pick a topic and start writing. I discussed this last year when I wrote about Establishing Your Personal Brand and Credibility Through Blogging. This is the same concept, except you no longer need a blogging platform.
I tell my clients to pick a topic, write multiple posts in a series, and see what people think. What you want is for your LinkedIn connections and others to read, share, and comment on your posts. Based on the response, you will have an idea what you should write about, or whether to switch to a different topic.

How often should I publish?

Be consistent! Pick a frequency that you can maintain. Once a week, every other week, once a month…start by writing 3-5 posts before you publish the first post. You will be able judge pretty quickly whether the frequency you picked is sustainable.

I will be publishing one post a week. I will also be republishing popular posts that I wrote for the Career Pivot blog from the last couple of years.

When should I publish?

In my opinion, early in the week and early in the day works best. This depends on where your readers might live or work. When I first started writing on the Career Pivot blog in 2011, I had readers in Iraq and Afghanistan (US Military). You might consider shifting the publishing time based on the time zone where most of your readers live.

How will readers find my posts?

If you subscribe to LinkedIn pulse, you get an e-mail every morning with articles that might interest you. LinkedIn will send to everyone who is subscribed to LinkedIn pulse and is a first degree connection a link to your article.

You should also promote your post on Twitter, FaceBook, LinkedIn, and Google+.  LinkedIn Publisher will inform you of how many people viewed your post and shared it on the various social networks. You will also be able to read and respond to comments.

You now have a simple to use, free blogging platform that makes it easy for your LinkedIn connections to find your posts. Now you can demonstrate that you know your stuff!

When are you going to get started?

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

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Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Inertia and Persistence as it Relates to Your Career

Inertia and Persistence

InertiaInertia inhibits us from moving forward in our career—persistence is what we need to keep us moving forward in our career.

Inertia

I am a baby boomer!

I was raised to be an employee to go to work for an employer who would take care of me.

We were also raised to be loyal to our employer no matter what. Therefore, we created a lot of inertia in our careers. Once we started something, we stayed and stayed and stayed…well until we got laid off or something happened to wake us up. For me, that was in 2002 with a near fatal bicycle accident. That accident set in motion a series of actions that has led me to where I am today. Until then, inertia had me stuck.

In today’s workplace, inertia is a dangerous thing. The world is changing fast, and you need to keep moving forward with your career.

Persistence

I have been interviewing entrepreneurs, and one key words keeps coming up—persistence.

The definition I like the best is:

“persisting, especially in spite of opposition, obstacles, discouragement, etc.; persevering”

The opposite of inertia.

I have helped multiple clients write their brand stories over the last year. In listening to them tell me their stories, I found a common theme—they have been laid off multiple times over the last dozen years. All have gotten back on their feet and moved forward in their careers. They showed persistence in spades.

Before that first layoff, inertia kept them from preparing for the next career pivot. However, once they were shoved forward and, often, off a figurative career “cliff,” they did not stop until they landed. Unfortunately, inertia would set in again until that next shove.

See the pattern:

  • We get comfortable, and inertia sets in
  • We get shoved into action
  • Our persistence kicks into gear
  • We land, and inertia returns

I have seen this over and over again. I have done this in my life. I bet you have, too!

How can we stay persistent and not let inertia settle in?

  • Take breaks. Yes, take a vacation. Take a day off before you become exhausted.
  • Celebrate success. Stop, sit, and digest the good feelings when you have a success.
  • Analyze failures, but return to the feelings of success. When failures occur—which they will—you have the option to go back to that time of success. Recapture those feelings.
  • Always look forward.
  • Be ever vigilant.

Persistence will keep your career moving forward.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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You can also download my latest white paper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

What Does Your Resume Say About Your Age

Your Resume and Your Age

The format and contents of your resume says a lot about your age. Age discrimination is a fact of life in today’s job market. This goes both ways for the young and the old. I want to discuss the signs that you are over 50 years of age and, hopefully, get you past the initial gatekeepers who might think you are too old.

Home Address

For many years, we sent our resume and cover letter through the mail. We put our home address right on the top. Fact is, there is no longer a need to put your home address on the resume anymore.

There are other reasons not to include your home address:

  • Economic profiling
  • Length of commute
  • Personal safety

If the employer needs your home mailing address, they can ask for it.

(More: Is the resume still relevant)

E-Mail Address

One sure sign that you are over 50 is to have a aol.com e-mail address, or even an e-mail address from your cable provider like rr.com on your resume.

Either sign up for a gmail address or get an e-mail forwarding service from:

  • A professional society – I have had e-mail addresses from IEEE and ACM both technology associations
  • Your Alumni Association – I have an e-mail address from my Northwestern Alumni Association
  • Get your own domain – I have one client who acquired his full name as a domain name like MarcMiller.com

All of these options say something about your professional brand.

I always recommend using a separate e-mail address for your job search.

(More: Social Media Strategy – My Resume)

Home Phone Number

Who under 45 years of age still has a home phone? We ditched our home phone five years ago, and I am quite a bit older than 45. If you still have a home phone and do not want to give out your cell phone number, get a Google Voice number. Put the Google Voice number on your resume as your cell number. You can set it up so that it will ring on multiple phones (both home and cell). It can be configured to transcribe the message, and then e-mail and text you the transcription. Some of the transcriptions can be really funny. I had one recruiter leave me a message and her name was transcribed as stressed out waters.

Double Space After Period

I am going to go out a limb and declare that putting two spaces after a period is obsolete. It is how most of us were taught to type on a typewriter. Therefore, most of us who do this (I have taught myself to stop putting two spaces after a period and it was hard) are over 50 years of age.

Over the years, I have heard that this has been used as a method of screening out older candidates.

Skills

Limit the skills you list on your resume to current and relevant skills. I have seen many technical resumes that list every system, software program, and technology that the applicant has ever worked on.

I could list that I wrote MS-DOS control programs, wrote machine level code developing word processors, managed IBM mainframe computers, and lots of other obsolete technologies. Unless I was applying for a position that required these skills, all it tells the reader is I am over 50 years of age and maybe older.

Look at your resume—what does it say about your age? Show it to others and ask them what it says about you.

Age discrimination is a fact of life in the job market today. You do not want to be filtered out by the staff who are screening initial resumes and lose the opportunity to demonstrate your talents and skills.

By the way, I chose to use resume rather than résumé in this article for the purists.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Check out the new Career Pivot Review offering.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out theBoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

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4 Steps in Creating Your Video Interview Environment

Video Interview

video interviewHave you had a video interview? If you have not been in a video interview yet, just wait.  This could be done via Skype, Google Hangouts, or a variety of other platforms. The key to a successful video interview is to look and, more importantly, sound your best.

Room Selection

The room environment where you will be interviewed is key. You want good, consistent lighting and excellent acoustics. Pick a room that is devoid of hard surfaces (like tile or wood floors), glass table tops, or lots of windows. Select a room with carpet and possibly drapes on the walls. When I record my webinars, I am in my master bedroom closet where the hanging clothes creates a studio-like audio environment. You probably cannot hold a video interview in your closet, but you get the point. You will want to position yourself in the room where you are less than six feet from a wall. If you webcam has an auto focus feature you will want the camera to focus on you and not something behind. A little trick is to buy a simple room divider with smooth surfaces and place it behind you. If you select the right room for your video interview everything else becomes so much easier.

Lighting

You want even, full spectrum lighting on the front of your face. If this is your home or office, most lighting is from above or the side. Purchase three inexpensive desk lamps and install full spectrum light bulbs. These will act as key lights and give you even lighting. Place these pointing up at your face on the front, left and right. Finally, close all of the window shades. Do not spend more than $50 on the lighting. You may already have the lamps in your house or office.

Audio

In the world of high definition video, your audio is more important than your video. Our tolerance for poor audio is much lower than for video. You will want to sound great. If you have picked the room properly with sound deadening materials this is fairly easy. Use a set of headphones. These could be the ear buds from your cell phone. You can run the wire underneath the back of your shirt so they do not show. This will eliminate any chance of an echo. If you use headphones you can use the microphone built into your computer. However, I prefer to use a USB condenser microphone. I use a Samson condenser microphone that I purchased with a pop filter several years ago for under $100.

Clothing and Body Positioning

Pick clothes that have color and look good on you. For most of us guys, we will need to ask for help. Avoid patterns on shirts, jackets and ties. The cameras have gotten a lot better at dealing with patterns, but it is still best to avoid them. I prefer my clients to be standing up when being interviewed. You will be able to use your hands naturally. Since you will only be on video from the waist up, wear shoes that will not generate any noise when you move around. Flip flops work great. The most important feature is to be in an environment where you feel comfortable. You are on stage and you want to give your best performance. Much has been written on how to perform during a video interview. However,  a great performance can come across poorly without the right environment.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

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Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Employee Referrals – Your Ticket to Your Next Job

Employee Referrals

Employee ReferralsDid you know that employee referrals have become the most valued tool in hiring?

I just returned from speaking at the Career Thought Leaders Conference in Baltimore. The theme of the conference was “Framing the Future”.  A common theme throughout many of the presentations was that employee referrals are golden.

I wrote extensively about the value of employee referrals in my Targeted Job Search series on this blog. I wrote about continuously building your referral network so that you stay employed at companies where you want to work.

Employee Referrals – The numbers don’t lie!

Gerry Crispin co-founded a non-profit, TalentBoard, to better define and measure the Candidate Experience. In his presentation, he presented some startling numbers on hiring, and the effect of employee referrals that came from the Candidate Experience Award.

The Candidate Experience Award process is a competition, but it is also designed to provide every organization that chooses to participate some confidential and specific feedback on how they can improve their candidate experience.

Gerry gave the following typical example:

  • 100 applications for every open position
  • 4 employee referrals will be submitted

Approximately, half of all candidates are screened out or deemed unqualified for the position which leaves:

  • 50 applications
  • 2 employee referrals

5 candidates will be interviewed including the 2 employee referrals.

The numbers do not lie. If you apply and an employee referred you for the position, 50% chance of getting an interview and you have a 20% chance of getting hired.

If you do not have an employee referral, you have a 3% chance of getting an interview and only 1.2% chance of getting hired.

What this should tell you is that employee referrals are invaluable!

The Employee Referrals Bonus

Employee referrals are so valued by many corporations that the employee referrals bonuses are commonly offered. The bonus is paid if the employee refers the candidate before the candidate applies and the candidate is hired. Therefore, before you apply for a job online seek out a referral!

In 2009, in the depth of the recession, I was working for a sexy tech startup…and we were hiring. I had more candidates from the Launch Pad Job Club, where I serve on the board of directors, asking me to submit their resume. My first question was always:

Have you applied online?

The answer almost every time was:

Yes

My response every time was:

Next time, please send me your resume first and only apply when I tell you.

Due to the fact that they already applied, I was not eligible for the bonus and their application would not be seen as a employee referral. Not every employee referral program works this way, but most do.

I was more than willing to work for these candidates because of my position with the job club. I was motivated by reasons other than money. I received close to 100 resumes that year, and only one sent it to me first. I received my $2500 bonus for that position. I do not know of another hire from the other 99.

If you want to boost your chance to get hired, work diligently on building your referral network.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

LinkedIn Endorsements Updated – FINALLY!

LinkedIn Endorsements

Linkedin EndorsementsMany of you have grown tired of LinkedIn Endorsements and being prompted to endorse your connections. Many of you have also grown tired of getting LinkedIn endorsements from people you have never worked with or getting LinkedIn endorsements for skills that you do not have like underwater basket weaving. (I do know of someone who received this endorsement). That is changing!

LinkedIn Endorsements Changes

If you edit your profile and scroll down to the “Skills & Endorsements” section and select edit You will be given four options.

I want to be endorsed

For most of us we want to be endorsed. Hey why wouldn’t I want to be endorsed?

If you are a financial adviser or any other position that is heavily regulated, they cannot be endorsed. This has been a real problem for financial advisers. Do not endorse your stock broker, insurance agent, fee based financial adviser…you create problems for them!

Do you want your connections to be prompted to endorse you? WOW that is a tough one. I have so many endorsements that the answer is probably no but…I am not sure on this one. I will leave the box checked for the time being.

This is one box that I will uncheck. I no longer want to be harassed to endorse my connections.

If I want to endorse someone I will explicitly go into their profile and endorse them. I have to do the same to make a recommendation.

If someone endorses me I still want know. Specifically, if they endorse me for a skill I do not possess I really want to know about it.

 Reorder Your Skills

It is a subtle change but you can now re-order your skills. Bring the skills that you want to LinkedIn endorsements to the top. This has two effects:

  1. Your connections will be prompted for the skills at the top of your list
  2. You will come up hirer is search rankings for the skills that you want to be found

Other LinkedIn Changes

There are a lot of other changes other than LinkedIn Endorsements that are coming.

 New LinkedIn Inbox

The inbox has been enhanced to be easier to use. For more information check out LinkedInExpert’s post.

New LinkedIn Groups Page

If you used the LinkedIn groups page in the past it has been fairly clumsy going in between groups. Now it has been greatly streamlined.

New LinkedIn Group Digest E-Mail Formats

If you belong to LinkedIn groups you may have noticed the changes to the digest e-mail formats. LinkedIn is currently beta-testing several formats and we will see which one wins.

LinkedIn Publisher

LinkedIn is opening up their publishing platform to everyone. Today, it is only for key influencers. They are slowly opening this up to everyone. Currently, you have to apply for early access. I applied several weeks ago and am still waiting for access.

LinkedInChat Tweetchat

If you want to stay up to date on changes to LinkedIn, participate in the weekly Tweetchat called LinkedInChat. This tweetchat is run by my friend Viveka von Rosen, aka @LinkedInExpert.  Her trusty sidekick, Steve Cassady, @SteveCassady is always there to assist.

I know the changes are happening fast and furious on LinkedIn right now. Hopefully, this update helps you keep up with how to create, manage and promote your personal brand.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Are You Your Authentic Self at Work?

Authentic Self?

authentic selfTo quote Dr. Phil

Are you living a life that is more in tune with your “authentic” self (who you were created to be) or your “fictional” self (who the world has told you to be)?

Gee, I never thought I would write a post where I would quote Dr. Phil!

Are you who you appear to be? Let me explain.

Many of us who have worked for 20 or more years have changed our behaviors there to fit in, to be a more attractive employee, to get paid more, to be more valuable,….. We have morphed our behaviors to fit in.

I am a certified Birkman consultant.  The Birkman assessment will tell you in nine different behaviors both how you appear and how you want to be treated. We are usually treated the way we behave. When the way we behave is markedly different than the way we want to be treated, issues arise.

Let me give you some examples.

Closet Introvert

My MBTI score is ENTJ. The E is for extrovert, or I behave like an extrovert. I can work a room at a networking event like a pro. I am an excellent presenter. The issue is, I am a closet introvert. When I finish a presentation or leave a networking event, I am exhausted. I am very good at behaving like an extrovert, but it exhausts me.

I have learned that, if I am going to teach a class all day, I need to spend the evening alone or with only a few close friends. I am not an extrovert. I really want to be left alone!

Most people do not know that about me. I know I am not the only one who masks his authentic self in this way!

Stealth Competitor

A stealth competitor is someone who appears to be all for the common good. They are very nice people. However, they feel if they do good work, it should be noticed and they should be rewarded.

The kicker is they never have to ask to be rewarded.

Unfortunately, this is very common in the western world. Many of us were trained by our parents and society that if we do good work, it will be noticed and we will get rewarded. We do not need to ask. 

Stealth competitors rarely feel they are valued at work.

Sound familiar? Stealth competitors are very common in certain work environments!

By the way, there is a very good book written on this topic – Know Your Value by Mia Brzezinski.

Structured Anarchist

I have had quite a few clients who are structured anarchists. The appear to be very orderly. They function well in a rules oriented environment. The issue is they have to create all of the rules!

These individuals want to create the rules. They are great at creating order out of chaos. If they enter a new environment they need the freedom to change the rules to their suit!

Sound familiar? There are a lot of you out there!

In each of these cases, the way people behave does not show their authentic self. They often are not perceived for who they are and, therefore, are not treated the way they want to be treated.

The personal brand you create is not completely authentic.

How about you?
This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

You’re Hired! Now What? – Targeted Job Search

Your Hired! Now What?

hiredYou have just been hired for your dream job! Well, maybe not your dream job, but the next step in your career. You have followed all of the steps in the targeted job search.

Before you read on, this is the sixth in this series on the Targeted Job Search. If you have not read the previous two steps, this is a good time to read them:

You’re done — right??

I grew up in the day when we expected jobs to last 10, 15, 20 or more years. Today, a job may last three years. Let me lay out a timeline and strategy for you.

Six Weeks

It typically takes six weeks into a new job to understand what you are doing and start setting goals.

Create a calendar entry on the six month anniversary date of your hired date. In that calendar entry document some realistic goals for the first six months on the job.

Six Months

You are now six months into your new job.

Review the goals you set. Did you accomplish everything?

Reflect back on the previous six months. What did you learn? What new skills have you acquired? You have probably been drinking from a fire house in the first six months on the job.  You really need to take the time and reflect back on what you learned.

Update your LinkedIn profile and resume.

Create a calendar entry on your one year anniversary date of your hired date. In that calendar entry, document some realistic goals for the next six months on the job.

One Year

You have now been in your new job for one year.

Review the goals you set. Did you accomplish everything?

Reflect back on the previous six months. What did you learn? What new skills have you acquired?

Update your LinkedIn profile and resume.

Create a calendar entry on your eighteen month anniversary date of your hired date. In that calendar entry document some realistic goals for the next six months on the job.

Update your target list!

Eighteen Months

You have now been in your new job for eighteen months.

Review the goals you set. Did you accomplish everything?

Reflect back on the previous six months. What did you learn? What new skills have you acquired?

Update your LinkedIn profile and resume.

Create a calendar entry on two year anniversary date of your hired date. In that calendar entry document some realistic goals for the next six months on the job.

Update your target list!

Start strategically networking for your next job.

See the pattern?

Even though you start working your target list at eighteen months, it does not mean you will leave. What you are doing is making yourself a good passive candidate.

When a position does become available, you want to know about it.

If your company is acquired, you want to be prepared to move on if the culture changes.

You think that your job search has ended. Well, it really never ends. It has only been put on pause.

Are you ready for a targeted job search?

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Registration is now open for the Cure for Career Insanity Webinar series

Check it out!

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Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers.

Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Build Your Referral Network – The Targeted Job Search

Your Referral Network

referral networkAbout 85% of all jobs are filled through employee referrals. Therefore, it makes sense to build a referral network at every company where you might like to work in the future.

Before you read on, this is the fourth in this series on the Targeted Job Search. If you have not read the previous steps this is a good time to read them:

I have written about building and researching your target list. You connected to recruiters inside your target companies, primarily to have closer connections to their employees via Linkedin. Now it is time to build your referral network.

Using LinkedIn advanced search, locate employees with similar job titles and certifications and develop a list of potential new connections.

At this point you can take a couple of different strategies:

Strategy #1 – Look for a Common Connection

For each 2nd degree person on your list, look to see how you are connected on LinkedIn.  Pick one of your common connections and ask how well they are acquainted and would they be willing to make an introduction?

What you are looking for is a personal introduction. In the sales world, this is referred to as a warm lead.

Strategy #2 – Systematically Look at LinkedIn Profiles

Every day, look at a couple of LinkedIn profiles on your list. Make sure your LinkedIn setting called “Select what other see when you’ve viewed their profile” is set to display your name.  On a daily basis, look to see who has looked at your profile.

When someone pokes their head into your profile, send them a LinkedIn connection request and ask for AIR – Advice, Insights and Recommendations!

Once they have looked at your profile, you are no longer an unknown. They should recognize your name and know a little bit about you.

Whether you use strategy #1 or #2, the idea is to get to meet each person and develop a relationship. You are looking for an internal advocate so that, when a position becomes available, they will be willing and able to pass your resume through company channels.

This takes time and persistence. If you spend 15-30 minutes reaching out to new connections and meet one new person week, you will build a significant referral network in just a few months.

As you build your referral network, it is equally as important to maintain that network through careful and persistent cultivation.

The goal is to have a referral network at every company on your target list.

We know that people change jobs every few years. You will want to review your target list to check who is working at each company every six months.

If you carefully follow all of the steps in the Targeted Job Search, you will have choices in where you work for the rest of your career.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Marc Miller Career Design Specialist