Do You Have a Plan B for Your Career

Do You Have a Plan B for Your Career?

plan bYou have probably been told that you should have a Plan B. What if something does not work out?

How about having a Plan B for your career?

I entered the job market in the 1970s when I expected to work for one employer for most of my career. Well, that lasted 22 years and I have had six in the last 16 years. Most of those transitions were planned, which means I planned very well, or that I was lucky!

What should you be prepared for?

Cyclical Professions

In my most recent past, I have been involved in the two very cyclical professions:

  • Recruiting
  • Learning and Development (Training)

Recruiters are the first hired when the economy picks up AND the first to be let go when the economy slows down.

Learning and development professionals know that their mission can easily be eliminated.

Ask any recruiter or trainer whether they have a Plan B for their career.

Mergers and Acquisitions

I have worked for two successful tech startups that were acquired. Both eventually started to lay staff off. This can be due to eliminating redundant positions, or because expectations of growth after an acquisition are not attained.

Rarely has there been a merger or acquisition where layoffs do not eventually follow! It may take a couple of years but…

If you work for a company where an acquisition or merger is possible, you better have a Plan B for your career!

Patents

I currently have multiple clients in the pharmaceutical industry. Many companies have patents on pharmaceuticals that are going to expire in the next few years. Several of these companies and announced multi-year staff reduction plans.

Patent protection is key to profitability in many industries, but when the patents expire it is like going over a cliff. Profits dry up over night!

If you work in the pharmaceutical industry or any other industry dependent on patent protection, you should always have a Plan B.

Economic Bubbles

We all know what happened in the last two recessions. Having worked in the semi-conductor and telecommunications industry during the dot com bubble, I knew the end was coming and acted accordingly. Similarly, I was working in the non-profit industry raising money from the financial industry at the beginning of the great recession. In hindsight, I saw the collapse coming but did nothing about it. I got lucky and moved to a safe place in late 2007.

If things seem just too good to be true, you need a Plan B!

Unforeseen Situations

Sometimes stuff just happens. I recently wrote about being put in a highly unethical position by my employer. I had a Plan B already in place, but I was not prepared to act quickly enough.

What will you do if your employer places you in an untenable position? Do you have a Plan B?

If you follow the steps of the Targeted Job Search, you will always be prepared to move to your next position.

You never know when you will need a Plan B for your career.

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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You can also download my latest white paperThe Multi-Generational WorkplaceMaking Generational Diversity Work

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Does Your Personality Mesh with Your Career

Personality Mesh with Your Career?

personalityYour personality is a key factor in finding happiness in your career. Unfortunately, when we make our initial career choices, we may ignore certain key traits or just focus on where we can make the most money.

Kinetic Programmer

I learned to program computers in high school in the early 1970s. Yes, they had computers back then!

I decided to study computer science at the Northwestern University Technological Institute, which is now the McCormick School of Engineering. I loved to solve problems. I enjoyed writing programs in a variety of languages, even assembler code. I would often find myself writing programs for a couple of hours at a time.

I graduated in 1978 and went to work for IBM.  My job was to program the latest trend—word processors. I was supposed to sit in my office for eight hours a day with a coding pad and write assembler code. This kind of code is directly translatable into computer instructions (it is very tedious to program and hardly anyone does it anymore). Once I was done writing a significant amount of code, I would sit at my desk and review it. Then my team would get together and perform code reviews.

The problem with this is that I am a very high-energy guy. I cannot sit at a desk for more than an hour at a time. I am social. I like being around people. My personality was not suited to just sitting behind the desk and programming for hours at a time.

I spent six years being miserable before I moved into a new role where I no longer wrote programs, but supported Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems. I got to work with people, solve problems, and often got to work with my hands.

I was not genuinely happy until I moved into a training function where I taught the latest technologies developed at IBM. That transition took over ten long years.

My personality with the need for high activity was in direct conflict with sitting at a desk for long hours as a computer programmer. My personality did not mesh with my career choice.

Structured Anarchist

I have a client who has been a finance guy in the non-profit sector for most of his career . He appears to be very structured and orderly.

After graduating from college with a liberal arts degree, he became a non-profit executive director. He decided to get an MBA from a prestige business school because they had a non-profit track in their curriculum.  When he started the program and was sitting with his advisor, he asked when he would get to take the non-profit courses. After a few perplexing questions his advisor said “We should have removed those from the course catalog years ago.” Despite this, he stuck it out and finished his MBA in Finance.

He appears to structured and orderly, but he only works well when it is his structure. He is really good at creating order out of chaos, but once he finishes, he gets bored. He wants another problem to solve.

He has been in one non-profit organization after another, fixing the problems, then getting bored and leaving.

He is now building sales programs. He does not sell! He creates sales systems and then trains sales partners on how to implement them. He creates the structure and gets to interact with people to implement that structure. Not your typical finance guy.

His personality told everyone that he was very orderly, but his need for very little outside structure caused people to place him in positions where there was already a lot of structure…that he could not change. Therefore, he was often unhappy.

It was only after he sought out a role that was compatible with his personality, rather waiting than being placed in a role, that he was happy. He became proactive and not reactive.

The Challenge

Just because you are good at something does not mean you will want to do it for a career. We are often pushed into career paths because we appear to have certain traits. I wrote previously a post titled Are You Your Authentic Self at Work.

Just because we have certain talents does not mean you can apply them in the business world.  Just ask artists and musicians about applying their talents in the business world. This is why it is important to try a career before you fully commit. Try before you buy!

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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You can also download my latest white paperThe Multi-Generational WorkplaceMaking Generational Diversity Work

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

When Your Ethical Boundaries are Crossed

Ethical Boundaries

Ethical BoundariesWe all have ethical boundaries. We know what we think is ethical behavior at work, but what do you do when your ethical boundaries are crossed?

Have you really thought what you would do if asked to do something that you considered unethical?

Have you considered what you would do if your boss or others in corporate management did something that you considered unethical?

Until a little over four years ago, I had never really thought about it. That was, until my last employer was acquired. I started to see changes in behavior in the senior management that concerned me.

We were also in the middle of the great recession. We were hiring when many other companies were laying staff off.

It started with a director who tried to hire a close relative. The relative interviewed for a lower level position and was about to get an offer when this individual’s background check did not pass corporate guidelines.

There was a sigh of relief that could be felt throughout the office.

This was not in my management chain, but it was a warning—and I ignored it. It was 2010, and the economy still was in the tank.

Pushing Against My Ethical Boundaries

Several months later, I received a resume from a senior executive. It was the resume of a close relative that the senior executive wanted me to consider for an open position.

The problem was that this individual was not even vaguely qualified.

I was then pressured by my boss to interview this individual. I should have started to make plans to leave!

It was a phone interview, and I explained that he was not qualified for the current position. I also offered advice on where he might want to look for employment in the city where his qualifications would be valued.

To make a long story short, I was pressured to interview this individual in person. I did so against my better judgement.

I refused to hire the individual.

My boss then created a position working for him directly and hired the relative. I found this out through indirect channels.

What to do next?

I had not created a Plan B. I knew it was coming, but I ignored the possibility.

I confronted my boss and was told it was a done deal.  There was nothing I could do about it. I was even expected to train the individual for the newly created position. My ethical boundaries were crossed!

I strategically did the following:

  • Kept my mouth shut. I mentioned that my ethical boundaries had been crossed to my HR representative, but when asked whether to carry this up the management chain, I said no. I trusted no one!
  • Consulted my financial adviser. It was comforting talking to someone about the financial risk and having it confirmed that I was making a rational financial decision.
  • Finished the legal paper work to create my business. My business plans were already in the works. I accelerated everything by 9-12 months.
  • Calculated to the day when I would give two weeks notice and get the greatest financial benefit. This included getting my quarterly bonus, getting within 14 days of my next options vesting, and having the company pay for health insurance for the rest of the month.

It was three months from the time I confronted my boss to when I turned in my resignation. This was a miserable three months.

I wish I had spent time formulating a Plan B when I got the first indication of bad ethical behavior. My mistake!

I had never thought about what I would do if my ethical boundaries were crossed. I now teach in the Targeted Job Search to always be prepared to leave your current job.

You never know when you might be laid off or have your ethical boundaries crossed.

Do you have a Plan B?

Do you have a similar story to tell? What did you do?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

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Retirement and Career Planning – Do You Neglect Both?

Retirement and Career Planning

PlanningYou may be wondering what retirement and career planning have in common.

For most baby boomers, we have neglected both!

My mantra is I am a baby boomer who was raised to be an employee, and I was to go to work for a father-like company who would take care of me until I retired.

Retirement planning—there was no need!

Career planning—my company was going to help and guide me with that!

(More: Baby Boomers and Retirement “Professional” Infographic

Help with Retirement Planning

I was listening to talk radio last weekend when a local financial services ad played.  The advertisement talked about a report by Harvard University professor Robert Merton that discussed the impending retirement crisis. I found the article, called The Crisis in Retirement Planning, on Audible.com and listened to it. It’s very thought provoking.

Most of us baby boomers when we started our careers were offered a defined benefit retirement plan (pension). This was professionally managed and, when we decided to retire, we would have a lifetime income in our retirement. By the late 1990s, companies were rapidly phasing out defined benefit plans.

Starting in the late 1980s, defined contribution retirement plans (IRA and 401(k)) were offered. We would contribute money each paycheck, and our employer might match a portion. We were responsible for managing the portfolio. When we retire, we need to manage how to create an income stream. Do you know how create income from your 401(k) or IRA? I don’t.

I have a unique perspective on this topic. My father was a research economist for the New York Stock Exchange for over 25 years. I grew up hearing my father talk about the financial markets. My father was an egghead intellectual.

When I graduated from college in the late 70s and started my career with IBM, I thought I could manage my own money. When I reached my 30s, I realized I did not know crap on how to manage my money, so I sought a financial adviser. I have been with one ever since.

Professor Merton’s premise is that most of us are not qualified to manage our retirement portfolio. I agree with him.

I could study up and do it myself, which I am sure some of you do. But…I do not want to. I have no interest in the topic.

Have you run a retirement calculator? 56% of workers report that they have not attempted to calculate how much money they will need to have saved for a comfortable retirement. (Source: Employee Benefit Research Institute)

Are you qualified to perform retirement planning?

Are you ignoring retirement planning?

Are you getting help with your retirement planning? Will you be able to retire as you planned?

(More: Baby Boomer Career Development Plan

Help with Career Planning

I am in my late 50s and am on my seventh career! I started my career business in 2011. Looking back, I wish I had also had someone to advise me throughout my career.

The great recession shook the baby boomer generation to its core. Many baby boomers saw their retirement portfolios crumble and they exited the market. Many were laid off and, when they found jobs, they made significantly less money.

Suddenly, most of us plunged into a world where traditional job search methods were thrown out the window. Social media became the way many companies found talent. Your resume is almost irrelevant.

I am approached frequently by baby boomers who have been unemployed for six months or longer. Many voluntarily took a package. They are now in financial trouble. They come to me looking for help, but they can no longer afford to pay me. They waited thinking they could find that next job on their own.

In 2013, I was twice approached by retired senior military who had left the military and thought they would quickly find jobs in the private sector. Both came to me after 9 months of unemployment—in a panic.

A couple of weeks ago, I was approached by a former CFO who took a voluntary package. She has been unemployed for a year, and is now dipping into her retirement savings. I told her a typical job search for someone like herself is 12-18 months and could be longer if it is not handled properly.

I am working with two clients at the same company to plan their exit. That exit could come in the next three months or over the next three years. They will move when the time is right!

Just like retirement planning, are you qualified to manage your career?

Just like retirement planning, are you ignoring managing your career?

Do not wait until you get laid off. Plan your career NOW! Always be ready for your next career pivot!

Contact me for a free 30 minute consultation

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

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When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paperStrategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Career Reflection – A Twice a Year Duty

Career Reflection

Career ReflectionHow often do you perform a career reflection? In the Targeted Job Search,  I suggest that you plan to do this twice a year. There are two special times of year to perform a career reflection:

  • July 4th holiday
  • New Years

These two times are approximately 6 months apart and most of us have the time off from work.

Goals

Did you achieve your goals over the last six months?

If not, what is to be learned?

I set goals for this website and increased traffic. Starting in February, LinkedIn began instituting major changes that reduced the traffic by 90%. In June, website traffic had been restored to previous levels, which is about seven thousand visitors a month.

What did I learn? I must always have a Plan B.

This is a good time to put an entry in your calendar for six months from now. Create goals for the next six months and write them in your calendar.

Career Reflection

Reflect back over the last six months:

  • What did you accomplish? Make note of quantifiable accomplishments.
  • What new skills did you acquire? What can you do now that you could not do six months ago?
  • What did you learn about yourself? This is a great time to take notice of what is important in our lives. It is easy to focus on others and not ourselves. At least this is true for me!

In the last six months, I had my first paid speaking engagement outside of Austin. My presentation titled “The Multi-Generational Workplace – Why Can’t We All Get Along” has been in hot demand. If this is of interest to your place of business, please contact me.

Spend some time and clearly document your accomplishments,  new skills, and lessons learned and file this away to be reviewed in six months.

Time to Update

Once you have completed your career reflection, it is time to update your LinkedIn profile and your resume! Updating your LinkedIn profile and resume should be a regular habit. You never know what will happen in the next six months. Besides, you want to be a good passive candidate with updated information in your LinkedIn profile.

It is also a great time to update your target list.

Who do you want to work for next? This does not mean you will be changing jobs, but you want to be ready!

Spend time researching perspective companies, as well as your connections into those companies. Who do you know or who can make an introduction to a strategic individual? Remember, when you meet a strategic connection, you will be Asking for AIR – Advice, Insights and Recommendations!

If you have been in your position over two years, I suggest you actively work your target list. With the median duration of employment at just over five years, you should plan on staying in a job less than that and allow eighteen months for a passive job search.

If you are willing to perform a career reflection exercise twice a year, document your results, and update your resume, LinkedIn profile, and target list, you will always be ready for the next step in your career.

Are you ready?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Check out the new Career Pivot Review offering.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

When you subscribe to this blog you get full access to Career Pivot’s Whitepaper Library

————————————————

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

————————————————

You can also download my latest white paperStrategic Networking – A Career Pivot White Paper

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

The Career Playbook Series: Boomers + Second Half Plays

PlaybookCareer Playbook

Do you have a playbook for your career? I wish I’d had a playbook when I started my career!

What about now?

Do you feel a little lost and not sure where to go next?

For many of us who are over 50 years of age, the concept of career has changed. It is now just about making enough money to pay the mortgage and put food on the table.

The work world has changed. The concept of being hired for a full time job and receiving a steady paycheck is rapidly disappearing.  For most baby boomers, this is really scary.

(More : Over 50 and long term unemployed – What do you do?)

What if you had a Baby Boomer Career Playbook that laid out your options going forward?

I was recently introduced to Carleen McKay who is with Ageless In America and the San Diego Mature Workforce Coalition.

Carleen has launch the first of a series of playbooks. It is called The Career Playbook Series: Boomers + Second Half Plays.

The concept behind this playbook is to give you real life examples of what you could do if you exited the traditional world of full time employment.

The book contains real stories from real people (names were changed to protect the innocent!).

You do have options rather than going to work full time for an employer! For many, going to work full time is no longer an option.  This book provides powerful stories and lessons about baby boomers who have taken a different path.

  1. Portfolio Workers – Juggling preferences
  2. Starting Over – When the job you once held no longer exists
  3. Starting Out – Entering the workforce for the first time at 50+
  4. Learners – Repositioning through learning
  5. Virtual Workers – Working from here, there and anywhere but an office
  6. “Freelancers” – Temps, free agents, contractors
  7. Interim Executives – Leaders of change
  8. Global Workers – Working from everywhere
  9. Job/Work Cyclers – Managing multiple changes
  10. Barterers – Collaborating and gain-sharing
  11. Good Workers – Doing what matters for others
  12. Subject-Matter-Experts – Focusing on expertise
  13. The Buyers – Small businesses or franchises
  14. The Innovators – Entrepreneurs and solopreneurs

Download it now! It is free!

Other Playbooks

Carleen is helping others create playbooks. Here are two playbooks that are in the works:

The Playbook for The Young Women of STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Math)

Less than half of young people entering STEM careers are young women.  Role models and the stories of successful Millennial women in these careers are, in my opinion, the prime motivator to encourage women into the careers that will dominate the future.

 The Playbook for Interns

It’s intention is to encourage internships in order to ensure employ-ability upon college graduation.  While written primarily for anticipated graduates; all stages of internships will be addressed.

Take a moment and download The Career Playbook Series: Boomers + Second Half Plays and let me know what you think.

Does this help you along in your career journey?

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers or join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

3 Steps to Walking Into Your Interview with Confidence

Confidence is the number one factor to having a successful interview!

ConfidenceIf you walk into an interview feeling good about yourself, it will exude from every pore. The one thing you cannot fake is passion.

I am going to give you three steps to take starting 45 minutes before an interview. Step 3 may sound a little crazy, but stick with me.

Step 1

Arrive 45 minutes early for your interview and find a quiet place. This could be just sitting in your car. It could be sitting in the lobby of the company where you are interviewing. It could be a bathroom stall. Bathroom stalls have multiple purposes in life!

I want you to sit quietly with your eyes closed and go back in your mind to a very happy experience. This could be a great vacation, a winning moment in a game, getting your acceptance letter to college, college graduation, accepting an award at work…

Sit there for a full 10 minutes and soak up those good feelings.

Do you feel the confidence growing?

Step 2

If you have a close friend who is willing to help, call them and ask them for a pep talk. If not, give yourself a pep talk.

Do not do this in your head. I want you to say out loud that you are good, no… you are damn good, no… you are damn *&^%$ good! You can customize this to how you would say it, but I want you to hear the words.

Do this for ten minutes. Yes, if you are in a crowded area like a busy street, some people might think you are crazy for talking to yourself. Well, I talk to myself all of the time! I am one of the most interesting people I know!

Do you feel the confidence growing?

You are now 15 minutes from your interview. We are ready for step 3.

Step 3

Step 3 is based on the premise your body shapes who you are. Amy Cuddy was a TED Talk presenter and in her video Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are, she explains that, when you take on powerful and winning body shapes, it will increase testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain.

You will feel more confident.

For this activity, you will probably need to go into a bathroom stall. Stick your hands up like Usain Bolt when he won the 100 meter dash at the Olympics. Keep them up for two minutes and soak in that winning feeling. If you still do not believe me, read her paper, Power Posing.

Yes, I know this sounds crazy but it does work!

Follow these three steps to feel more confident walking into your next interview.

 

This post is part of a weekly series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.  Join us on the BoomerJobTips LinkedIn Group

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Career Planning for 2014 During the Holiday Season

Career Planning for 2014?

Career PlanningNow is the time to start career planning for 2014. The holiday time is a great time to reflect, catch up, and make plans for 2014.

I wrote previously about creating Career Development plans for yourself. Take a moment to read that post, as we want to start the process NOW!

I am writing this post as I am riding in the car to get out of town, get some rest and reflect.

Reflect Back on 2013

Reflect back to the beginning of 2013. What were you doing? What were your plans for 2013?

What skills have you acquired in the last year?

What have you accomplished?

I will be taking the next few days of down time to reflect back and write down all of my accomplishments and new skills gained.

Next, I will look at what did not work out as planned. What did I learn from the experience?

For example, I piloted with great success my Cure for Career Insanity webinar series in 2012, with plans to launch it in 2013. I never launched it this year because I was at loss on how to market it effectively. What I learned was I got ahead of myself. I was at least a year too early in building of the business. I will launch it in Q2 of 2014.

Catch Up with Friends, Colleagues and Relatives

I have to keep reminding clients that their next job will most likely come through a connection. It may come through a connection that has nothing to do with your profession.

I have a current client that I have to remind that she has a huge untapped network in the parents of her children’s friends. Your daughter Susie plays on a soccer team and you may know the wife of an important executive at one of your target companies because her daughter plays on the same team with Susie!

When I left corporate America for the first time to teach high school math, my best connection was my chiropractor. My chiropractor knew me well, understood and appreciated my values, and knew a LOT of people.  Expand your thoughts about your network beyond the traditional work relationships.

The holidays are a great time to seek out these people and make or renew connections.

Who have you lost touch with in the last couple of years? Reach out and find out how they are doing!

Make Plans for 2014

Write that development plan for 2014.

Remember the four steps I highlighted in my post:

  1. What do you want to do in your career in the next one, three and five years?
  2. What direction is the industry heading? You need to be keeping track of the pulse of your industry.  What are the strategic directions? How does industry directions correlate with what you want to do?
  3. What skills do you currently have and what skills do you need to acquire?
  4. how to you integrate these new skills into your online presence (LinkedIn profile, blog, Twitter feed,….), your resume and your personal brand? How are we going to advertise and actively promote our newly acquired skills?

This will take some time. Plan on having this complete by New Years day 2014.

Are you ready to for some Career Planning for 2014?

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Special Notice – Starting in December

I am initiating a free monthly teleconference where I will address a pressing topic and then take questions.

You will need to register for the event and you can provide a question ahead of time that I will be prepared to answer on the call.

The first call will be on Tuesday December 10, 2013 at 1 PM CT / 2 PM ET / 11 AM PT

Career Planning for 2014 – What you can be doing over the holiday season to prepare for 2014?

Register now

I plan on holding these once a month and generally keep them to under 1 hour.

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Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my latest whitepaper Personal Branding for Baby Boomers – What It Is, How to Manage It, and Why It’s No Longer Optional!

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

3 Facts Impacting Your Career and How to Manage It – Guest Post

Career Career Management

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, career is defined as “course or progress through life.” Wikipedia defines it as “an individual’s journey through learning, work and other aspects of life.”

Since career is described as a course and a journey, it would yield best results if it were actively and effectively managed. Otherwise, it is a collection of disconnected tasks and events with unpredictable and often undesirable outcomes.

It used to be that people studied a field and then went to work for a company for 20 or 30 years. Companies had vested interests in managing their employees’ careers to maximize the employees’ benefits to the company.

Fast-forward to today where:

  • Average length of employment is roughly 4.5 years according to US Bureau of Labor.
  • 90% of Millennials are expected to stay in jobs for less than 3 years, according to Future Workplace “ Multiple Generations @ Work” survey of 1,189 employees and 150 managers.
  • The average employee will have 15-20 jobs over the course of their working lives.

The employers no longer look at the relationships with their employees as long-term relationships. They expect plug-and-play hires. This means managing your career is your responsibility and yours alone. Active management means ensuring your career’s path is laid out, reviewed, and adjusted on regular basis. Conscientious employers used to do this for their employees, since it was in their own best interest—but it is now we, the individuals who need to do this.

Numerous studies support the fact that individuals who can articulate and demonstrate the business value of their accomplishments are more successful. They are more in demand and earn higher incomes.

These trends and market forces are creating the need for tools that enable individuals to take charge of their career and manage them more effectively. This calls for a tool that is designed specifically to address the needs of professionals for capturing their career achievements and facilitating communication of their career stories succinctly for every job opportunity. This is what a Career Management Platform is all about.

A comprehensive Career Management Platform should enable individuals to preserve their body of work or career assets (professional portfolio) in any digital format and media type (video, images, links, PDF, etc.). When creating and managing the portfolio of work, consider the following:

  • Capture and maintain all achievements (expertise, accomplishments, skills, education, training, patents, publications, etc.) as well as work experiences (compensated or volunteer). This enables assembling focused profiles/resumes that provide the most effective positioning for every given job opportunity.
  • Understand, capture, and articulate the business value of the achievements.
  • Capturing each achievement as a separate portfolio element.
  • Capture the details of each achievement as soon as possible and update them as new information becomes available. Portfolio elements should be added to a profile on an as-needed basis to best communicate/support credentials or convey the career story.

When it comes to exploring career opportunities, all experts and career coaches emphasize having a tailored and focused resume for each opportunity. These professionals suggest preparing a profile (resume) accompanied by a set of befitting achievements that best address the requirements of the particular job opportunity.  The random acts of applying with a generic resume or slightly reworded one yields no desirable results.

Talentral is the Career Management Platform that addresses today’s savvy and conscientious professional’s needs. It is an innovative system that simplifies the task of managing all career assets, and it facilitates creation of focused presentations that effectively communicate every aspect of a career story. This platform enables members to:

  • Develop and maintain a complete rich media portfolio of work privately and securely.
  • Have one public profile and multiple private profiles that are accessible through managed URLs. Each member is provided with a unique vanity URL for their default public profile and all other profiles are assigned unique managed URLs.
  • Move achievements between portfolio and profiles with ease.
  • Tweet or post any profile to Facebook directly from the platform.
  • Receive direct communications on each profile.

You are in charge of your career – with Talentral you can Maximize your Potential.

Author:

Career management and personal branding expert. Kamyar Faron has been coaching and guiding professionals at all experience levels maximize their potential through active career management, career planning and personal branding. Is it a new career starting in college or after graduation? Is it a career transition in need of rebranding and repositioning?

He is founder and CEO of Talentral, which is the merger of his two passions, technology and helping people at a personal level. Talentral is a Career Management Platform, which enables professionals at all levels reach their maximum potential.

Kamyar has also been an advisor to a number of startups focusing on messaging, product positioning, business model, and channel development. He received his bachelor of science degree in electronics engineering form Northrup University and went on to pursue his MBA at University of California at Berkeley.

Kamyar lives in San Francisco Bay Area with his wife of 20 years and his twin 16 year old daughters – let’s not forget Leo the spoiled Pomeranian with an attitude.

See Kamyar’s Talentral Profile here.

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Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist

Curating Your Career by Creating a Career Scrapbook

Curating Your CareerWhat the heck is curating your career?

Curating your career is collecting information, maybe projects you were involved with, awards you won, campaigns you created and putting it all together in one place in a way that lets people visually comprehend what your career has been about. It’s a little like keeping a scrapbook. You can also include stuff that’s related to your career but not just about you, that helps the social angle.

As a child of the 1960′s and 1970′s, when we had real photographs and we received in depth news via newspapers and magazines we would collect items that we wanted to remember or maybe show off.

We kept scrapbooks. You know the ones that your grandmother wanted to show you or the ones you created for a school project.

I had a scrapbook of newspaper articles where my name appeared. My last two years in high school I was a pretty good quarter miler and my name would appear in the local newspaper every time I finished 1st, 2nd or 3rd in a major meet. If I won, my name might appear in an article. Pretty good stuff for a teenager in the 70′s. Pictures and articles went into my scrapbook.

Your Career Scrapbook

I have been blogging over the last couple of months on using social media to manage your career.  I have been discussing using blogs, LinkedIn and social media in general to promote your personal brand. One way of showcasing your talent or promote your personal brand is to curate content online or create a scrapbook of interesting webpages, pictures, articles,…

I have been using a product called RebelMouse. RebelMouse allows you to create an online scrapbook. I created the Career Pivot BoomerJobTips page on the Career Pivot website using RebelMouse. I have set it up to automatically pull content from my CareerPivot Twitter feed, other users Twitter feeds, RSS feeds, and FaceBook pages.

At this point you can rearrange the content however you would like by going to the native BoomerJobTips RebelMouse page. It is just like having an online scrapbook.

I found this a fascinating way for people to view content that I have selected. They do not need to be on FaceBook or Twitter. (Yes, a lot of Baby Boomer guys are not on Facebook or Twitter!) Oh by the way it is free or at least for now it is free for the basic features.

Did you have a scrapbook as a kid?  Do you like finding and collecting interesting articles on the Internet? Are you curating your career and did not know it?

Start curating your career and promote it among your friends.

(Disclosure – I have no financial connection to RebelMouse other than being a happy customer.)

This post is part of a new regular series on the Personal Branding Blog.

You can read the original post on the Personal Branding Blog.

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Like what you just read? Share it with your friends using the buttons below?

Subscribe

Check out my book which is available on Amazon.com!

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for Baby Boomers

You can also download my whitepaperDon’t Retire Even If you Can and What to do Instead – A Baby Boomer Manifesto

Check out the BoomerJobTips Page for the latest  curated content relating to baby boomers.

Marc Miller Career Design Specialist